Lakes of the Manitoba Province, Canada

This MODIS true-color of image of Canadas province of Manitoba focuses on the cluster of lakes in the area. Lake Winnipeg, the largest of them, is located in the center of the image. To its left, from top to bottom respectively, are Cedar Lake, Lake Winnipegosis, and Lake Manitoba.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

Por Carlos Solís
Map of Sacatepéquez, Guatemala

1.Antigua Guatemala, 2. Jocotenango, 3. Pastores, 4. Santo Domingo Xenacoj, 5. Sumpango 6. Santiago Sacatepéquez, 7. San Bartolomé Milpas Altas, 8. San Lucas Sacatepéquez, 9. Santa Lucía Milpas Altas, 10. Magdalena Milpas Altas, 11. Santa María de Jesús, 12. Ciudad Vieja, 13. San Miguel Dueñas, 14. Alotenango, 15.San Antonio Aguas Calientes, 16. Santa Catarina Barahona.
Source: owje.com

Por Carlos Solís
Bell-Beaker culture en Europe 2400 – 1900 BC

The Bell-Beaker culture (sometimes shortened to Beaker culture, Beaker people, or Beaker folk; German: Glockenbecherkultur), ca. 2400 – 1900 BC, is the term for a widely scattered cultural phenomenon of prehistoric western Europe starting in the late Neolithic or Chalcolithic running into the early Bronze Age. The term was coined by John Abercromby, based on their distinctive pottery drinking vessels.
Source: Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch. This image is part of the ongoing Landsat Earth as Art series.

Por Carlos Solís
Deforestation in Rondonia, Brazil

This true-color MODIS image of the Rondonia region of Brazil shows the massive deforestation underway in the south-central Amazon Basin.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

Por Carlos Solís
Iceland and Blooms

This SeaWiFS images shows phytoplankton blooms off the coast of Iceland.
Source: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

Por Carlos Solís
Red Tide off Texas Coast

Red tides (algae) bloomed late this summer along a 300-mile stretch of Texas Gulf Coast, killing millions of fish and shellfish as well as making some people sick. State officials are calling this the worst red tide bloom in 14 years. The algae produces a poison that paralyzes fish and prevents them from breathing. There is concern that the deadly algae could impact or even wipe out this years oyster harvest in Texas, which usually peaks during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. The red tides were first observed off the Texas coast in mid-August and have been growing steadily in size ever since. Red tides tend to bloom and subside rapidly, depending upon changes in wind speed and direction, water temperature, salinity, and rainfall patterns (as the algae doesnt do as well in fresher water). This true-color image of the Texas Gulf Coast was acquired on September 29, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASAs Terra spacecraft. The red tide can be seen as the dark reddish discoloration in the ocean running southwest to northeast along the coast. In this scene, the bloom appears to be concentrated north and east of Corpus Christi, just off Matagorda Island. The image was made at 500-meter resolution using a combination of MODIS visible bands 1 (red), 4 (green), and 3 (blue). The city of Houston can be seen clearly as the large, greyish cluster of pixels to the north and west of Galveston Bay, which is about mid-way up the coastline in this image. Also visible in this image are plumes of smoke, perhaps wildfires, both to the north and northeast of Houston.
Source: Image courtesy Andrey Savtchenko, MODIS Data Support Team, and the MODIS Ocean Team, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Por Carlos Solís