Satellite Image, Photo of Quebec
Quebec. Ice still clings to rivers and lakes in Quebec, on May 18, 2003. At the top of this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from the Aqua satellite, the slivery ice stands out against he green forests. The city of Quebec sits at the opening of the St. Lawrence River into the Gulf of St. Lawrence in the center of the image. Upstream (to the southwest) is the city of Montreal. At lower left is Lake Ontario, with the Adirondack Mountains to the east. At lower right are the Gulf of Maine and the Bay of Fundy, home to the wrold´s most dramatically varying tides.
Fuente: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Humo asiático encima del Canadá oriental
Un río de más de las corrientes de humo en el este de Canadá este color verdadero espectrorradiómetro de imágenes de resolución moderada (MODIS) de la imagen del satélite Terra el 24 de mayo de 2003. El humo procedía de la quema de incendios en el este de Rusia, a miles de millas de distancia. El humo de los arroyos de Quebec, Canadá, y el Golfo de San Lorenzo.
Fuente: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Satellite Image, Photo of Quebec in Summer
Quebec glow brilliantly green in this true-color Terra MODIS image acquired August 23, 2002. Lac St-Jean (top center) and the St. Lawrence Bay (upper right). At the innermost point of the St. Lawrence is the city of Quebec, which appears as a gray splotch against the deeper green of the surrounding vegetation. Connected to the St. Lawrence Bay is the St. Lawrence Seaway, which passes the city of Montreal (lower left center), and eventually connects to Lake Ontario (lower left corner). To the north of Lake Ontario is the province of Ontario; while to the east and south is the northern United States. Specifically, New York State sits on Lake Ontario and also lays claim to most of Lake Champlain (bottom center). Progressing eastward from New York are the states of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. To the east of Maine is Canada's New Brunswick province, and just barely visible at the bottom right corner of the image is the peninsular province of Nova Scotia.
Fuente: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Satellite Image, Photo of Quebec Center
Quebec. Reservoir Manicouagan sits inside a 214-million-year-old impact crater in Quebec. The crater that surrounds the reservoir is almost 100 km in diameter, though it has eroded over the years due to glaciation, rain, and other erosional processes. The reservoir itself is almost 70km in circumference and surrounds the impact crater's central uplift, which has become the island Ile Reme-Levasseur. Reservoir Manicouagan is near the border of Quebec and Newfoundland, and waters from Manicouagan eventually flow into the St. Lawrence water body. A month ago this region was covered in snow, but it has since melted off and Canada's fire season has begun. The fire in this image (red dots), which lies between Manicouagan and the Newfoundland border, is in the midst of a boreal forest. A large burn scar and quite a lot of smoke are visible in the image. This MODIS true-color image was acquired June 22, 2002.
Fuente: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Satellite Image, Photo of St. Lawrence River, Quebec
A complex network of several waterways and rivers converge on the St. Lawrence River in the vicinity of Montreal (just below the center of the image). Except for a few bridges, the urban infrastructure of Montreal is not obvious on this small scale image. The Ottawa River enters the St. Lawrence River west of Montreal (lower edge, right of center). The St. Lawrence River extends across the entire picture from Lake St. Francis (lower right edge of image) to northeast of St. Peter Lake (dark, oval shaped feature, lower left). The large water body partially obscured by wispy clouds at the top edge of the image is Lake Champlain.
Fuente: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA
Satellite Image, Photo of Saint Lawrence River, Quebec
A 60-mile (97-kilometer) stretch of the Saint Lawrence River as it flows northeast toward the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and then into the Atlantic Ocean can be seen in this near-vertical photograph. As the river flows northeast, it increases in width from approximately 12 miles (20 kilometers) to almost 30 miles (50 kilometers) at its widest point. Bounded on either side by the Canadian province of Quebec, the Saint Lawrence River is the connecting link for shipping traffic between the Atlantic Ocean and the Great Lakes. The area shown in this photograph was covered by the Laurentide Ice Sheet that covered the northeastern part of North America 10 000 to 15 000 years ago. The effects of the erosive power of the ice sheet and the widespread scouring caused by the movement of the continental ice sheets are evident on this landscape. The glaciers created a chaotic drainage system both north and south of the river. A smooth-looking relief with many lakes is a remnant from the glacial action. Both the Laurentian Mountains north of the Saint Lawrence River and the Notre Dame Mountains south of the river are ancient, worn, low mountains with average elevations of approximately 2000 feet (610 meters); traces of snow are observed in both mountain ranges. The thin linear features primarily north of the river are power line rights-of-way. The Saguenay River enters the Saint Lawrence River from the northwest, and Lake Temisquate is the elongated lake south of the river.
Fuente: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA
Satellite Image, Photo of Sept-îles, Gulf of St Lawrence, Quebec
Sept-îles, Gulf of St Lawrence, Quebec, Canada Seven Island Bay (left side of the image) is one of the largest and best-protected harbors on Quebec's north shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Because this is both a deep-water port and ice-free year round, Sept-îles is one of Quebec's busiest ports. Locally produced materials (iron ore, alumina) comprise the bulk of port traffic, but Sept-îles also acts as a trans-shipment point for goods moving to Europe, the Far East, and South America. The small city of Sept-îles (~30,000 people) appears in the center of the view; Pointe Noir is opposite the city in the lower left corner. The industrial park is at top left, and the angled runways of the airport appear east of the city. Five of the bay's seven islands appear at the bottom of the view. Wind and swells produce patterns on the water. Ships can be seen in the bay, and a ship wake appears between the two left islands at the bottom of the view.
Fuente: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA
Satellite Image, Photo of Manicouagan Reservoir, Quebec
Manicouagan Reservoir, Canada December 1983. Located in a rugged, heavily timbered area of the Canadian Shield in Quebec Province, Manicouagan Reservoir is impressive in this low-oblique, west-looking photograph. The reservoir, a large annular lake, marks the site of an impact crater 60 miles (100 kilometers) wide. Formed almost 212 million years ago when a large meteorite hit Earth, the crater has been worn down by many advances and retreats of glaciers and other processes of erosion. The reservoir is drained at its south end by the Manicouagan River, which flows from the reservoir and empties into the Saint Lawrence River nearly 300 miles (483 kilometers) south.
Fuente: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA
Satellite Image, Photo of George River, Quebec
George River, Quebec, Canada August 1997. The northward flowing George River is located southeast of Ungava Bay in extreme northeast Quebec. The George River winds through a glaciated wilderness that consists of low hills and a multitude of lakes (dark features of various sizes and shapes). Continental icesheets scoured the terrain thereby producing depressions that have subsequently filled with water which appear as numerous dark lakes. Shallow soils, bare rock surfaces, and year round cold temperature produce sparse vegetation throughout the region. Although rapids break the course of the George River, many adventurous canoeists have traversed the river all the way north to the estuary that empties into Ungava Bay.
Fuente: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA
Satellite Image, Photo of Clearwater Lakes, Quebec
Clearwater Lakes, Quebec, Canada November 1985. These twin circular lakes (large dark features) were formed simultaneously by the impact of an asteroidal pair which slammed into the planet approximately 290 million years ago. The lakes are located near the eastern shore of Hudson Bay within the Canadian Shield in a region of generally low relief in northern Quebec province. Notice that the larger western structure contains a ring of islands that surrounds the center of the impact zone. The lakes are named after their exceedingly clear water. Also notice that the surrounding terrain shows widespread scarring from glaciation. The multitude of linear and irregular shaped lakes (dark features) are the result of gouging or scouring action caused by the continental ice sheets that once moved across this area.
Fuente: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA
Satellite Image, Photo of Quebec in Spring
Quebec. This true-color image of Quebec was acquired on April 19, 2001, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. Quebec City is located on the St. Lawrence River, which bisects this image from lower left to upper right. Montreal is at the lower left, also along the St. Lawrence.
Fuente: Jacques Descloitres, NASA GSFC, based on data from the MODIS land team
Satellite Image, Photo of Quebec, Canada
Depression over the Hudson Bay. This MODIS true-color image shows a spiral of clouds centered over the Hudson Bay, and draped over parts of Manitoba (left), Ontario (bottom center) and Quebec (right)
Fuente: Jacques Descloitres, NASA GSFC, based on data from the MODIS land team
Satellite Image, Photo of Lake Manicouagan in Northern Quebec
Manicouagan Impact Structure, Quebec. The large annular lake in this image represents the remnants of one of the largest impact craters still preserved on the surface of the Earth. Lake Manicouagan in northern Quebec, Canada, surrounds the central uplift of the impact structure, which is about 70 kilometers in diameter and is composed of impact-brecciated (relativley large pieces of rock embedded in finer grained material) rock. Glaciation and other erosional processes have reduced the extent of the crater, with the original diameter estimated at about 100 kilometers. This natural-color image of the region was acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer's (MISR's) nadir (vertical-viewing) camera on June 1, 2001. The impact that formed Manicouagan is thought to have occurred about 212 million years ago, toward the end of the Triassic period. Some scientists believe that this impact may have been responsible for a mass extinction associated with the loss of roughly 60% of all species. It has been proposed that the impact was created by an asteroid with a diameter of about 5 kilometers. The lake is bounded by erosion-resistant metamorphic and igneous rocks, and shock metamorphic effects are abundant in the target rocks of the crater floor. Today Lake Manicouagan serves as a reservoir and is one of Quebec's most important regions for Atlantic salmon fishing.
Fuente: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team
Quebec
Provincias orientales de Canadá resplandor verde brillante en este color verdadero de imágenes MODIS Terra adquirió 23 de agosto de 2002. El mayor en la provincia de Quebec es la imagen, el hogar de Lac St-Jean (arriba centro) y la Bahía de San Lorenzo (parte superior derecha). En el punto más interior de San Lorenzo es la ciudad de Quebec, que aparece como un gris splotch contra el más profundo verde de la vegetación circundante. Conectados a la Bahía de San Lorenzo es el Lawrence Seaway, que pasa por la ciudad de Montreal (inferior izquierda), y, finalmente, se conecta al Lago Ontario (esquina inferior izquierda). Al norte del Lago Ontario es la provincia de Ontario, mientras que hacia el este y el sur es el norte de los Estados Unidos. Concretamente, el Estado de Nueva York se encuentra en el lago Ontario y también establece reclamación a la mayoría del lago Champlain (parte inferior central). Avanzando hacia el este de Nueva York son los estados de Vermont, New Hampshire y Maine. Al este de Maine es la provincia de New Brunswick de Canadá, y apenas visible en la esquina inferior derecha de la imagen es la península de la provincia de Nueva Escocia.
Fuente: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Quebec
Reservoir Manicouagan se sienta dentro de un 214 - millones de años de edad, los cráteres causados por impactos en Quebec, Canadá. El cráter que rodea el embalse es casi 100 km de diámetro, a pesar de que se ha erosionado con el tiempo debido a la glaciación, la lluvia, y otros procesos erosivos. El embalse en sí es casi 70 kilometros de circunferencia y rodea el cráter de impacto de la central de incremento, que se ha convertido en la isla Ile Reme - Levasseur. Reservoir Manicouagan está cerca de la frontera de Quebec y Newfoundland, y las aguas de Manicouagan la larga desembocan en el río San Lorenzo cuerpo de agua. Hace un mes, esta región estaba cubierta de nieve, pero desde entonces han derretido y fuera de Canadá ha iniciado la temporada de incendios. El fuego en esta imagen (puntos rojos), que se encuentra entre Manicouagan y de la frontera de Terranova, se encuentra en medio de un bosque boreal. Una gran cicatriz y quemar una gran cantidad de humo son visibles en la imagen (véase más alta resolución para grabar la cicatriz). MODIS Esta imagen de color verdadero o fue adquirido 22 de junio de 2002.
Fuente: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Humo de los incendios en Quebec transportado encima de los Grandes Lagos y del noreste de Estados Unidos
En el centro de Québec, Canadá, numerosos incendios forestales (puntos rojos) son billowing espeso humo hacia el suroeste. A los pocos días, el humo que había llegado a los Grandes Lagos y Nueva Inglaterra regiones de los Estados Unidos. Esta serie de imágenes del espectrorradiómetro de imágenes de resolución moderada (MODIS) comienza el 5 de julio de 2002.
Fuente: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Incendio forestal y humo en Quebec, Canadá
En el centro de Québec, Canadá, numerosos incendios forestales (puntos rojos) son billowing espeso humo hacia el suroeste. A los pocos días, el humo que había llegado a los Grandes Lagos y Nueva Inglaterra regiones de los Estados Unidos. Esta serie de imágenes del espectrorradiómetro de imágenes de resolución moderada (MODIS) comienza el 5 de julio de 2002.
Fuente: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC
Humo de incendios en Quebec transportado encima de la costa este de Estados Unidos
En el centro de Québec, Canadá, numerosos incendios forestales (puntos rojos) son billowing espeso humo hacia el suroeste. A los pocos días, el humo que había llegado a los Grandes Lagos y Nueva Inglaterra regiones de los Estados Unidos. Esta serie de imágenes del espectrorradiómetro de imágenes de resolución moderada (MODIS) comienza el 5 de julio de 2002.
Fuente: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Buscador

Continentes

1

Divisiones

1