Italy

Relatively few clouds mar the view of Italy in this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image captured on September 19, 2003 by the Terra satellite. Also visible are France, Switzerland, Germany, and Austria from left to right along the snow-capped Alps, and from the top right corner going down, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia, Romania, Yugoslavia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Saharan dust over the Mediterranean

A river of Saharan dust is flowing northeastward from the deserts of northern Africa in this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image captured by the MODIS sensor on NASAs Terra satellite on May 4, 2004. The airborne river stretches northward over the Mediterranean Sea for more than 1,000 kilometers and is several hundred kilometers wide in places. The dust is spreading across the heel of the “boot” of Italy at top right.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Eruption of Stromboli Volcano, Italy

Situated on one of Italys Aeolian Islands due north of Sicily, the Stromboli Volcano began another of its recurrent eruptions on Dec. 28, 2002. Seismologists have recorded increasing activity within Stromboli since May 2002. On Nov. 15 a small amount of lava began to flow from one of its summit craters. These true-color images of Stromboli were acquired in late Dec. 2002 and January 2003 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites.The red outline shows the hot crater where lava has been flowing. Stromboli is one of the most active volcanoes on Earth and has been erupting off and on for about 2,000 years.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Eruption of Stromboli Volcano, Italy

Situated on one of Italys Aeolian Islands due north of Sicily, the Stromboli Volcano began another of its recurrent eruptions on Dec. 28, 2002. Seismologists have recorded increasing activity within Stromboli since May 2002. On Nov. 15 a small amount of lava began to flow from one of its summit craters. These true-color images of Stromboli were acquired in late Dec. 2002 and January 2003 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites.The red outline shows the hot crater where lava has been flowing. Stromboli is one of the most active volcanoes on Earth and has been erupting off and on for about 2,000 years.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Snow in Italy and Sicily

This pair of true- and false-color images feature snow in Italy and the surrounding countries and was acquired on February 7, 2003, by the Terra MODIS instrument. In the false-color image, black represents liquid water, turquoise blue represents snow, white represents clouds, and green and brown represent snow- and ice-free land surfaces. This false-color image makes clouds and snow easily distinguishable, since in the true-color image, they are quite difficult to tell apart when the clouds are over snowy areas. However, the true-color image, gives details about water bodies that are missed in the false-color image, such as the presence of bluish-green clouds that indicate silt from river drainage and possibly the presence of microscopic marine life. It also marks the locations of fires (in red), such as the continuing eruption of Stromboli Volcano to the west of the toe of the Italian boot.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Snow in Italy and Sicily

This pair of true- and false-color images feature snow in Italy and the surrounding countries and was acquired on February 7, 2003, by the Terra MODIS instrument. In the false-color image, black represents liquid water, turquoise blue represents snow, white represents clouds, and green and brown represent snow- and ice-free land surfaces. This false-color image makes clouds and snow easily distinguishable, since in the true-color image, they are quite difficult to tell apart when the clouds are over snowy areas. However, the true-color image, gives details about water bodies that are missed in the false-color image, such as the presence of bluish-green clouds that indicate silt from river drainage and possibly the presence of microscopic marine life. It also marks the locations of fires (in red), such as the continuing eruption of Stromboli Volcano to the west of the toe of the Italian boot.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Eruption of Stromboli Volcano, Italy

The northernmost of Italy’s Aeolian Islands, Stromboli is simply the summit of a volcanic mountain that rises up out of the sea. The volcano has been in a virtually constant state of eruption since Roman times, and its spectacular nighttime eruptions make it a popular volcano-watching location. In recent times, most eruptions result in lava and pyroclastic flows toward the northwest coast of the island. This image from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite on March 5, 2003, shows a plume of emissions from Stromboli wafting eastward over the Mediterranean Sea toward Italy. No thermal (heat) signature was detected by MODIS at this time.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Sediment off the east coast of Italy

Off the east coast of Italy, sediments brighten the coastal waters of the Adriatic Sea (right). The sediments may have been churned up by tides or may be the result of late-winter (almost spring) snow melt and run off from the mountainous terrain along the spine of the country. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on March 18, 2003.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fog in the Golfo di Taranto

A bank of fog has snuggled up to the southern coast of Italy in the Golfo di Taranto (north of center) in this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from the Terra satellite on April 30, 2003. To the southwest of Italy is Sicily, where snow stands out on the dark, volcanic flanks of Mt. Etna.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC