Flooding of the Elbe in Germany

Heavy rains in Central Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has witnessed in over 100 years. The floods have killed over 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary, and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. This false-color image of the Elbe River and its tributaries was taken on August 20, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA—s Terra satellite.The floodwaters that inundated Dresden, Germany, earlier this week have moved north. As can be seen, the river resembles a fairly large lake in the center of the image just south of the town of Wittenberg. Flooding was also bad further up river in the towns of Maqgdeburge and Hitzacker. Roughly 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes in northern Germany. Fifty thousand troops, border police, and technical assistance workers were called in to combat the floods along with 100,000 volunteers. The floodwaters are not expected to badly affect Hamburg, which sits on the mouth of the river on the North Sea.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

The Elbe (before flooding), Germany

Heavy rains in Central Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has seen in over 100 years. The floods have killed over 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. These true- and false-color images of the flooding of the Elbe and Danube Rivers and their tributaries were taken in August 18, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard the Terra satellite. In Dresden, Germany, portions of the Elbe River (blue line running from roughly the center of the image northwest toward the North Sea) rose from the usual summer high of 6 feet (1.8 meters) to over 30 feet (9.1 meters). The water, which reached levels not seen since 1845, seeped into the historic buildings and threatened precious works of art. City officials estimate that the damage to Dresden would probably exceed $100 million. As the floodwaters moved north over the weekend, thousands of people abandoned the cities of Magdeburge and Bitterfeld, Germany, and rescue workers lined exposed riverbanks with sandbags. German meteorologists expect the flooding to subside over the next week as little rain is expected. In the false-color images, vegetation is green, water is dark blue or black, and clouds are light blue or white. The images from July show the area prior to floods.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

The Elbe (before flooding), Germany

Heavy rains in Central Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has seen in over 100 years. The floods have killed over 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. These true- and false-color images of the flooding of the Elbe and Danube Rivers and their tributaries were taken in August 18, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard the Terra satellite. In Dresden, Germany, portions of the Elbe River (blue line running from roughly the center of the image northwest toward the North Sea) rose from the usual summer high of 6 feet (1.8 meters) to over 30 feet (9.1 meters). The water, which reached levels not seen since 1845, seeped into the historic buildings and threatened precious works of art. City officials estimate that the damage to Dresden would probably exceed $100 million. As the floodwaters moved north over the weekend, thousands of people abandoned the cities of Magdeburge and Bitterfeld, Germany, and rescue workers lined exposed riverbanks with sandbags. German meteorologists expect the flooding to subside over the next week as little rain is expected. In the false-color images, vegetation is green, water is dark blue or black, and clouds are light blue or white. The images from July show the area prior to floods.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Flooding on Elbe River

Heavy rains in Central Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has witnessed in more than a century. The floods have killed more than 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary, and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. This false-color image of the Elbe River and its tributaries was taken on August 20, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASAs Terra satellite. The floodwaters that inundated Dresden, Germany, earlier this week have moved north. As can be seen, the river resembles a fairly large lake in the center of the image just south of the town of Wittenberg. Flooding was also bad further downriver in the towns of Maqgdeburge and Hitzacker. Roughly 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes in northern Germany. Fifty thousand troops, border police, and technical assistance workers were called in to combat the floods along with 100,000 volunteers. The floodwaters are not expected to badly affect Hamburg, which sits on the mouth of the river on the North Sea.
Source: Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

Floods in Germany

Heavy rains in Central Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has seen in over 100 years. The floods have killed over 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary, and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. This false-color image of the Elbe River and its tributaries was taken on August 18, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging. Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA?s Terra satellite. In Dresden, Germany, portions of the Elbe River rose from the usual summer high of 6 feet (1.8 meters) to over 30 feet (9.1 meters). The water, which reached levels not seen since 1845, seeped into the historic buildings and threatened precious works of art. City officials estimate that the damage to Dresden would probably exceed $100 million. As the floodwaters moved north over the weekend, thousands of people abandoned the cities of Magdeburge and Bitterfeld, Germany, and rescue workers lined exposed riverbanks with sandbags. German meteorologists expect the flooding to subside over the next week as little rain is expected
Source: Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

Flooding on Elbe River

Heavy rains in Central Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has witnessed in more than a century. The floods have killed more than 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary, and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. This false-color image of the Elbe River and its tributaries was taken on August 18, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASAs Terra satellite. Portions of the Elbe River rose from the usual summer high of 6 feet (1.8 meters) to over 30 feet (9.1 meters). In the Czech Republic capital of Prague, which sits at the lower right-hand corner of the image, residential streets filled with water and thousands were evacuated from their homes. Further north in Dresden, Germany, the floods reached levels not seen since 1845. The water seeped into the historic buildings and threatened precious works of art. City officials estimate that the damage to Dresden will probably exceed $100 million. As the floodwaters moved north over the weekend, thousands of people abandoned the cities of Magdeburge and Bitterfeld, Germany, and rescue workers lined the exposed riverbanks with sandbags. German meteorologists expect the flooding to subside over the next week as little rain is expected.
Source: Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

Space Radar Image of North Sea, Germany

This is an X-band image of an oil slick experiment conducted in the North Sea, Germany. The image is centered at 54.58 degrees north latitude and 7.48 degrees east longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 6, 1994, during the second flight of the spaceborne radar. The experiment was designed to differentiate between petroleum oil spills and natural slicks floating on the sea surface. Two types of petroleum oil and six types of oils resembling natural sea surface slicks were poured on the sea surface from ships and a helicopter just before the space shuttle flew over the region. At the bottom of the image is the Sylt peninsula, a famous holiday resort. Twenty-six gallons (100 liters) of diesel oil was dissipated due to wave action before the shuttle reached the site. The oil spill seen at the uppermost part of the image is about 105 gallons (400 liters)of heavy heating oil and the largest spill is about 58 gallons (220 liters) of oleyl alcohol, resembling a natural oil like the remaining five spills used to imitate natural slicks that have occurred offshore from various states. The volume of these other oils spilled on the ocean surface during the five experimental spills varied from 16 gallons to 21 gallons (60 liters to 80 liters). The distance between neighboring spills was about half a mile (800 meters) at the most. The largest slick later thinned out to monomolecular sheets of about 10 millimeters, which is the dimension of a molecule. Oceanographers found that SIR-C/X-SAR was able to clearly distinguish the oil slicks from algae products dumped nearby. Preliminary indications are that various types of slicks may be distinguished, especially when other radar wavelengths are included in the analysis. Radar imaging of the worlds oceans on a continuing basis may allow oceanographers in the future to detect and clean up oil spills much more swiftly than is currently possible. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X- SAR) is part of NASAs Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASAs Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR.
Source: NASA JPL

Coal Mines in Germany

This simulated natural color scene shows a 30 by 36 km (19 by 22 miles) region in the German state of North Rhine Westphalia (located in midwestern Germany). The myriad rectangular patches are agricultural fields; light green hues show where crops are growing and grey hues show bare soil. Darker green hues show forested areas. The various blue-grey clusters of pixels seemingly linked together by dark thin lines are towns and villages connected by roads. The data used to produce this scene were acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), flying aboard NASAs Terra satellite, on August 26, 2000. On the right side of the image are three enormous opencast coal mines (bright white and dark blue patterns). The Hambach opencast coal mine has recently been brought to full output capacity through the addition of the No. 293 giant bucket wheel excavator--the largest machine in the world. This excavator is twice as long as a soccer field and as tall as a building with 30 floors. To uncover the 2.4 billion tons of brown coal (lignite) found at Hambach, five years were required to remove a 200-meter-thick layer of waste sand and to redeposit it off site. The mine currently yields 30 million tons of lignite annually, with annual capacity scheduled to increase to 40 million tons in coming years.
Source: Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

Flooding on Elbe River

Heavy rains in Central Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has witnessed in more than a century. The floods have killed more than 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary, and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. This false-color image of the Elbe River and its tributaries (right) was taken on August 20, 2002, by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+), flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. The floodwaters that inundated Dresden, Germany, earlier this week have moved north. As can be seen, the river resembles a fairly large lake in the right-hand side of the image just south of the town of Wittenberg. Flooding was also bad farther downriver in the towns of Magdeburge and Hitzacker. When this image was taken, tens of thousands of people had been evacuated from their homes in Germany. Fifty thousand troops, border police, and technical assistance workers were called in to combat the floods along with 100,000 volunteers. Normally, the river would just resemble a thin line (left, image acquired August 14, 2002). Though these false-color images may appear slightly different, both images encompass the same land area and both were created using the same ETM+ bands. In the right-hand image, land is primarily green with a little red, water is blue, and cities are slate gray. In the left-hand image, land is primarily red with patches of green, water is nearly black, and cities are purple.
Source: Image courtesy Jesse Allen, NASA Earth Observatory; data provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.