Floods in Argentina

In early May 2003, heavy rains in Argentina led to devastating floods that displaced 35,000 people and killed over 25 people in the province of Santa Fe. The floodwaters can be seen in these true- and false-color images acquired on May 8, 2003, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra spacecraft.All the rivers and tributaries in this region are much more swollen than normal. In the false-color image, water is black. Clouds appear as pale blue and white, and vegetated land is green and yellow.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Floods in Argentina

In early May 2003, heavy rains in Argentina led to devastating floods that displaced 35,000 people and killed over 25 people in the province of Santa Fe. The floodwaters can be seen in these true- and false-color images acquired on May 8, 2003, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra spacecraft.All the rivers and tributaries in this region are much more swollen than normal. In the false-color image, water is black. Clouds appear as pale blue and white, and vegetated land is green and yellow.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Satellite Image, Photo of Uruguay River, Rio de la Plata, Uruguay

Uruguay River, Rio de la Plata, Uruguay January 1990 Entering the scene at the bottom center of the view, the Uruguay River can be seen entering Rio de la Plata (River Plate) estuary. The Uruguay River rises in the hills of southern Brazil and is over 1000 miles (1610 km) long. The river flows in an arc west, southwest, and south before entering the estuary and forms the Uruguay (left) and Argentina border (right). The Rio Negro is visible in the lower left portion flowing through agricultural land into the Uruguay River. The Uruguay River supplies significant irrigation water and hydroelectric power to southeastern Brazil and Uruguay. A small portion of the great delta (dark region) of the Parana River is visible to the right center of the image. The estuary of the Rio de la Plata is a funnel-shaped indentation on the southern coast of South America. The estuary is 180 miles (290 km) long, and is 136 miles (219 km) wide where it opens on the Atlantic Ocean and a mere 30 miles (48 km) wide where the Uruguay and Parana Rivers join (just right of center of the image). Each year, the Uruguay and Parana Rivers carry an estimated 2 billion cubic feet (57 million cubic meters) of silt into the estuary, where the muddy waters are continuously stirred up by winds and tides. Dredging is constantly required to keep commercial shipping lanes open from the Atlantic Ocean to the port of Buenos Aires (gray-colored area towards the top right of the image, partially under clouds) and other ports in Argentina and Uruguay.
Source: NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Satellite Image, Photo of Uruguay

January is the height of summer in the southern hemisphere, and Uruguay was summer green on January 2, 2004, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite took this image. The Uruguay River flows down the left side of the image from the north, forming Uruguay’s western border with Argentina. As the river turns east to empty into the Atlantic Ocean, it meets the Parana River and becomes the Rio de la Plata, the muddy bay seen in the lower left corner of the image. In the north, Uruguay’s border with Brazil is defined by the Quarai River. Uruguay’s capital, Montevideo, forms a small grey spot on the northern shores of the Rio de la Plata. The larger city seen on the south side of the Rio de la Plata is Argentina’s capital, Buenos Aires.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Floods in Uruguay

Above average rains over the past two months have given rise to floods throughout Uruguay. These false-color images of the areas before and after the flood were acquired on April 2 and 27, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA.s Terra spacecraft. Over 3600 hundred people have been evacuated from their homes in Uruguay, and many highways have been shut down. The large river running down the border between Uruguay and Argentina is the Uruguay River, and the spidery lake in the center of Uruguay is Lake Rincon del Bonete. Normally, the lake and its tributaries cover a much smaller area (April 2 image).In these false-color images, land surfaces are tan and beige and water is black. The pinkish-white patches are clouds.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Uruguay

Above average rains over the past two months have given rise to floods throughout Uruguay. These false-color images of the areas before and after the flood were acquired on April 2 and 27, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA.s Terra spacecraft. Over 3600 hundred people have been evacuated from their homes in Uruguay, and many highways have been shut down. The large river running down the border between Uruguay and Argentina is the Uruguay River, and the spidery lake in the center of Uruguay is Lake Rincon del Bonete. Normally, the lake and its tributaries cover a much smaller area (April 2 image).In these false-color images, land surfaces are tan and beige and water is black. The pinkish-white patches are clouds.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Floods in Uruguay

Above average rains over the past two months have given rise to floods throughout Uruguay. These false-color images of the areas before and after the flood were acquired on April 2 and 27, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA.s Terra spacecraft. Over 3600 hundred people have been evacuated from their homes in Uruguay, and many highways have been shut down. The large river running down the border between Uruguay and Argentina is the Uruguay River, and the spidery lake in the center of Uruguay is Lake Rincon del Bonete. Normally, the lake and its tributaries cover a much smaller area (April 2 image).In these false-color images, land surfaces are tan and beige and water is black. The pinkish-white patches are clouds.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Uruguay and Southernmost Brazil

Above average rains over the past two months have given rise to floods throughout Uruguay. These false-color images of the areas before and after the flood were acquired on April 2 and 27, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA.s Terra spacecraft. Over 3600 hundred people have been evacuated from their homes in Uruguay, and many highways have been shut down. The large river running down the border between Uruguay and Argentina is the Uruguay River, and the spidery lake in the center of Uruguay is Lake Rincon del Bonete. Normally, the lake and its tributaries cover a much smaller area (April 2 image). In these false-color images, land surfaces are tan and beige and water is black. The pinkish-white patches are clouds.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Floods in Uruguay

Above average rains over the past two months have given rise to floods throughout Uruguay. The false-color image of the flood (right) was acquired on April 27, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASAs Terra spacecraft. Over 3600 hundred people have been evacuated from their homes in Uruguay, and many highways have been shut down. The large river running down the border between Uruguay and Argentina is the Uruguay River, and the spidery lake in the center of Uruguay is Lake Rincon del Bonete. Normally, the lake and its tributaries cover a much smaller area (left image, acquired on April 2, 2002). In these false-color images, land surfaces are tan and beige and water is black. The pinkish-white patches are clouds. To obtain a high-resolution copies of the scene acquired on April 2 (shown above, left), visit the MODIS Rapid Response Image Gallery.
Source: Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC