Satellite Image, Photo of Guajira Peninsula, Colombia

Guajira Peninsula, Colombia August 1992. The long, semi-arid Guajira Peninsula can be seen in the northeast-looking view. The peninsula, an extension of the eastern Andes Mountains, is 80 miles (128 km) long and 30 to 60 miles (48 to 97 km) wide. To the left of the peninsula is the Caribbean Sea, and to the right is the Gulf of Venezuela. Hills ranging in elevation in excess of 2100 feet (641 meters) are discernible near the northeastern end of the peninsula. The long narrow straight white-colored line extending from near the bottom center of the image to a point near Bolivar Bay, and the port city of Bolivar (not discernible) at the left center of the image, is a railroad. Near the upper right portion of the image, the resort island of Aruba is discernible. The western tip of Paraguana Peninsula of Venezuela is visible midway between the upper right and right center of the image..
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Satellite Image, Photo of Colombia

Marshes and wetlands line Colombia’s Magdalena River in its course north from the Andes Mountains to the Caribbean Sea. The wetlands, which form black and blue patches along the river in the false color image, are important for birds arriving from the north for the winter. The area had received heavy rain which triggered floods and landslides. Though the floods aren't visible in these images, the tan plume of sediment flowing into the Caribbean from the Magdalena River in the true-color image may be a result of high, fast-moving waters carrying extra mud into the sea. This true and false color image pair was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite on April 26, 2004.
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Floods in Colombia

Marshes and wetlands line Colombia’s Magdalena River in its course north from the Andes Mountains to the Caribbean Sea. The wetlands, which form black and blue patches along the river in the false color image, are important for birds arriving from the north for the winter. The area had received heavy rain which triggered floods and landslides. Though the floods arent visible in these images, the tan plume of sediment flowing into the Caribbean from the Magdalena River in the true-color image may be a result of high, fast-moving waters carrying extra mud into the sea. This true and false color image pair was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite on April 26, 2004.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Northern Colombia (before floods, false color)

Two months of heavy rain have taken a toll on northern Colombia. The rainy season, which runs from October to December, started with several days of intense rain in early October and has continued with torrential downpours through November. Many international aid agencies are calling this the most damaging rainy season in many years as floods and landslides have claimed the lives of 19 people and left over 200,000 homeless. The Colombian government has declared a state of emergency in eight provinces. These images, acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) on NASAs Terra satellite on November 22, and September 3, 2004, show many of the provinces that are being affected by floods. The flooding is easiest to see in the false-color images where water is black, vegetation is a brilliant green, and clouds are light blue. The images contrast the regions around the Magdalena River and its tributaries before the rains started on September 3, 2004, and during a break in the clouds on November 22. On November 22, black water filled the wetlands around the river, and smudges of black along the river point to overflowing river banks.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Northern Colombia (before floods)

Two months of heavy rain have taken a toll on northern Colombia. The rainy season, which runs from October to December, started with several days of intense rain in early October and has continued with torrential downpours through November. Many international aid agencies are calling this the most damaging rainy season in many years as floods and landslides have claimed the lives of 19 people and left over 200,000 homeless. The Colombian government has declared a state of emergency in eight provinces. These images, acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) on NASAs Terra satellite on November 22, and September 3, 2004, show many of the provinces that are being affected by floods. The flooding is easiest to see in the false-color images where water is black, vegetation is a brilliant green, and clouds are light blue. The images contrast the regions around the Magdalena River and its tributaries before the rains started on September 3, 2004, and during a break in the clouds on November 22. On November 22, black water filled the wetlands around the river, and smudges of black along the river point to overflowing river banks.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Floods in Northern Colombia (false color)

Two months of heavy rain have taken a toll on northern Colombia. The rainy season, which runs from October to December, started with several days of intense rain in early October and has continued with torrential downpours through November. Many international aid agencies are calling this the most damaging rainy season in many years as floods and landslides have claimed the lives of 19 people and left over 200,000 homeless. The Colombian government has declared a state of emergency in eight provinces. These images, acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) on NASAs Terra satellite on November 22, and September 3, 2004, show many of the provinces that are being affected by floods. The flooding is easiest to see in the false-color images where water is black, vegetation is a brilliant green, and clouds are light blue. The images contrast the regions around the Magdalena River and its tributaries before the rains started on September 3, 2004, and during a break in the clouds on November 22. On November 22, black water filled the wetlands around the river, and smudges of black along the river point to overflowing river banks.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Floods in Northern Colombia

Two months of heavy rain have taken a toll on northern Colombia. The rainy season, which runs from October to December, started with several days of intense rain in early October and has continued with torrential downpours through November. Many international aid agencies are calling this the most damaging rainy season in many years as floods and landslides have claimed the lives of 19 people and left over 200,000 homeless. The Colombian government has declared a state of emergency in eight provinces. These images, acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) on NASAs Terra satellite on November 22, and September 3, 2004, show many of the provinces that are being affected by floods. The flooding is easiest to see in the false-color images where water is black, vegetation is a brilliant green, and clouds are light blue. The images contrast the regions around the Magdalena River and its tributaries before the rains started on September 3, 2004, and during a break in the clouds on November 22. On November 22, black water filled the wetlands around the river, and smudges of black along the river point to overflowing river banks.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Floods in Colombia (false color)

Marshes and wetlands line Colombia’s Magdalena River in its course north from the Andes Mountains to the Caribbean Sea. The wetlands, which form black and blue patches along the river in the false color image, are important for birds arriving from the north for the winter. The area had received heavy rain which triggered floods and landslides. Though the floods arent visible in these images, the tan plume of sediment flowing into the Caribbean from the Magdalena River in the true-color image may be a result of high, fast-moving waters carrying extra mud into the sea. This true and false color image pair was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite on April 26, 2004.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Space Radar Image of Colombian Volcano

This is a radar image of a little known volcano in northern Colombia. The image was acquired on orbit 80 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994, by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X- SAR). The volcano near the center of the image is located at 5.6 degrees north latitude, 75.0 degrees west longitude, about 100 kilometers (65 miles) southeast of Medellin, Colombia. The conspicuous dark spot is a lake at the bottom of an approximately 3-kilometer-wide (1.9-mile) volcanic collapse depression or caldera. A cone-shaped peak on the bottom left (northeast rim) of the caldera appears to have been the source for a flow of material into the caldera. This is the northern-most known volcano in South America and because of its youthful appearance, should be considered dormant rather than extinct. The volcanos existence confirms a fracture zone proposed in 1985 as the northern boundary of volcanism in the Andes. The SIR-C/X-SAR image reveals another, older caldera further south in Colombia, along another proposed fracture zone. Although relatively conspicuous, these volcanoes have escaped widespread recognition because of frequent cloud cover that hinders remote sensing imaging in visible wavelengths. Four separate volcanoes in the Northern Andes nations of Colombia and Ecuador have been active during the last 10 years, killing more than 25,000 people, including scientists who were monitoring the volcanic activity. Detection and monitoring of volcanoes from space provides a safe way to investigate volcanism. The recognition of previously unknown volcanoes is important for hazard evaluations because a number of major eruptions this century have occurred at mountains that were not previously recognized as volcanoes. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASAs Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASAs Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtange- legenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency,Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations, and data processing of X-SAR.
Source: NASA JPL

Space radar image of Galeras Volcano, Colombia

This radar image of the area surrounding the Galeras volcano in southern Colombia shows the ability of a multi-frequency radar to map volcanic structures that can be dangerous to study on the ground. Galeras has erupted more than 20 times since the area was first visited by European explorers in the 1500s. Volcanic activity levels have been high in the last five years, including an eruption in January 1993 that killed nine people on a scientific expedition to the volcano summit. Galeras is the light green area near the center of the image. The active cone, with a small summit pit, is the red feature nestled against the lower right edge of the caldera (crater) wall. The city of Pasto, with a population of 300,000, is shown in orange near the bottom of the image, just 8 kilometers (5 miles) from the volcano. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/ X- SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 96th orbit on April 15, 1994. North is toward the upper right. The area shown is 49.1 by 36.0 kilometers (30.5 by 22.3 miles), centered at 1.2 degrees north latitude and 77.4 degrees west longitude. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The false colors in this image were created using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received). Galeras is one of 15 volcanoes worldwide that are being monitored by the scientific community as an International Decade Volcano because of the hazard that it represents to the local population.
Source: NASA JPL