Fires and smoke in Brazil

This series of images shows fires and deforestation in the Amazon in June 2003. A plume of smoke from fires (red dots) in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil hangs over the center of this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from the Terra satellite on June 16, 2003. At the top of that image, the Amazon Rainforest is becoming fragmented by areas of deforestation, which appear as geometric shapes of light green amid the deeper green of remaining forest. Right of center, a preserve/national park hangs like a pendulum down from the forests. This is the Xingu National Park and Indigenous Peoples Preserve. At bottom left in the image are Bolivia (north) and Paraguay (south). Running along the border of these two countries and Brazil is a large wetland ecosystem called the Pantanal.The fires continue into late June.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Internal waves in the Atlantic Ocean, northeast of Brazil

Northeast of Brazil, out in the deep waters of the Atlantic Ocean, sunglint highlights internal waves curving out toward the northeast. Internal waves are waves that occur underwater at the boundary between layers of water with different densities. Like all major bodies of water, the Atlantic Ocean is composed of layers of water with different densities: the topmost is the least dense, while each successively deeper layer is denser. Internal waves are usually caused by the lower layer being forced against a shallow obstacle, such as a ridge, by tidal action. The ridge causes a disturbance, which creates a wave in the water layer, similar to the way that the wind can cause waves on the water´s surface. Unlike normal surface waves, internal waves can stretch for tens of kilometers in length and move throughout the ocean for several days. Internal waves alter sea surface currents, changing the overall “sea surface roughness.” Where these currents converge, the sea surface is more turbulent, and therefore brighter because it catches more of the Sun´s reflection. Where the currents diverge, the surface is smoother and darker, creating zones called “slicks.”
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Southeastern Brazil

This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from the Terra satellite on February 9, 2003, shows sun glinting off the river systems in eastern Brazil. Spotty clouds hang over the coastal regions, and scattered fires detected by MODIS have been marked in red. At bottom center, a brownish-gray patch amid the green vegetation marks the location of Sao Paulo. To the northeast along the coast, a similar patch is the city of Rio de Janeiro.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in central Brazil

Scores of fires (red dots) were burning in central Brazil on February 10, 2003, and were detected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite. At right, the Araguaia River is caught in sunglint, and appears silver amid the green vegetation.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in Brazil

In northeastern Brazil, the dry season is coming to a close with scores of fires (red dots) crackling across the tropical landscape. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image was captured by the Aqua satellite on November 24, 2002. In the bottom left is northeastern Brazil, over which hover repeating patterns of small, puffy clouds. The Atlantic Ocean is at upper right, and the tan-colored sediment from the Amazon River is swirling near the coastline. In roughly mid-December, the rainy season will begin and last until May.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in the Amazon Basin of Brazil

The Amazon River runs west-east through this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from January 21, 2003. The dense Amazon Rainforest blankets most of the scene, but the appearance of roads (network of lines near top center) and fires (red dots) indicates some land clearing is likely underway.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in eastern Brazil

On January 5, 2003, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite captured this true-color image of eastern Brazil. Through the patchy clouds, MODIS detected a few scattered fires, which are marked with red dots. At right is the Atlantic Ocean.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Southcentral Brazil

In central Brazil, the headwaters of the Xingu River have become a National Park that is also an indigenous peoples reserve, where several different tribes try to maintain a traditional lifestyle in the shrinking Amazon Rainforest. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) highlights the pressure on the reserve. Along the perimeter of the reserve, which appears as an intact patch of solid green forest, there are numerous rectangular clearings and rows of lines which show large-scale farming and ranching, which often competes with the smaller farms maintained by some tribes. Fires such as those detected by MODIS in this image from April 28, 2003, are often used to clear land or prepare already cleared land for new planting. These fires, marked in red, can get out of control and burn into the rainforest. At right in the image are the Ilha do Bananal Wetlands along the Araguaia River. The Xingu flows northward to meet up with Amazon, and the Araguaia flows northward to meet up with Tocantins River.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Eastern Brazil

As human population expands, it encroaches on the forests of the Amazon in the Mato Grosso (lower left quadrant), Para (upper left quadrant), and Tocantins (upper right) regions of Brazil. At lower right is the state of Goias. The farms and ranches that are cleared out of the old forest appear light green or tan in comparison. Numerous fires have been detected and are marked with red dots. This image was acquired on June 8, 2003.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Eastern Brazil

Scattered fires (red dots) were detected across eastern Brazil on July 10, 2003, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite. At far left in the image, isolated patches of remaining forest are scattered in dark green squares and rectangles amid lighter green vegetation that is probably pasture or farmland. At center and right in the image, the vegetation changes to a duller green or brown, more typical of the savannas that dominate that region. The bright greenish lake is the Sobradinho Reservoir.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC