Satellite Image, Photo of Tierra del Fuego, South America

Southern Andes Mountains, Central Valley, Chile Winter/Spring 1997. Many volcanic peaks, snowcapped ridges and glacial lakes of the southern Andes Mountains are visible in this southeast-looking view. Between the mountains and the Pacific Ocean (lower right), the long, narrow, fertile Central Valley of Chile appears distinctly greener—on the wet side of the mountains—compared with the dry plains of Patagonia (top left). The Central Valley stretches southward to where it drops below sea level into the Gulf of Ancud (upper right). The glacial lakes of the forested slopes of the Andes begin with Lakes Colico, Caburgua, and Villarrica (bottom left portion of the image). Between Lakes Villarrica and Calafquén is the snow-covered stratovolcano Villarrica, which is active at this writing. The large lake with the small island near its center is Lake Ranco. Just to the south-southeast of Lake Ranco and at the center of the image is the Cordillera Nevada. The narrow complex lake on the Patagonian side of the Cordillera Nevada is Lake Nahuel Huapi. The large lake at the southern end of the Central Valley is Llanquihue. Chile’s major southern port of Puerto Montt is the small white patch at the north end of the Bay of Seno de Reloncavi (just south of Lake Llanquihue). Covering the upper left and top center of the image is the Patagonian Plateau..
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Satellite Image, Photo of Strait of Magellan, Chile and Argentina, South America

Until the Panama Canal was finished in 1914, the Strait of Magellan was the only safe way to move between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Protected by the Tierra del Fuego to the south and the bulk of South America to the north, ships crossed in relative ease, removed from the dangers of Drake Passage. Drake Passage is the relatively narrow stretch of ocean separating South America from Antarctica, the waters of which are notoriously turbulent, unpredictable, and frequented by icebergs and sea ice..
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Argentina

As the summer begins in the southern hemisphere, farmers in Argentina are facing difficult decisions. The soil in some of the most important crop growing areas is dry, and that has delayed planting. Analysts at the US Department of Agricultures Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) predict below-average yields for corn, sunflower seeds, sorghum, and peanuts. The most severe drought and subsequent planting delay is in the Cordoba Province, image left. Corn is typically planted in this area, but the delay has shortened the growing season. Farmers can plant late and expect a smaller harvest, plant corn for silage, or plant another crop such as soybeans. Many have already switched to soybeans, the FAS reports. The shortened growing season may also decrease the soybean yield, but with more soybeans planted than normal, the harvest should be larger than average. Even harder hit are the peanut and sorghum crops. Sorghum production is expected to be 25 percent lower than last season, and peanuts could be down by 10 percent from last season. These true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images show the contrast between this year and last year. Large tan regions in the image taken on November 20, 2003 indicate less vegetation than the image taken on November 15, 2002. Though rains in the first week of December brought relief to this region, more moisture is still needed for developing crops. On the left side of the image, the Rio de la Plata forms the border with Uruguay. The cement-colored patch on the western shore is the Argentine capital city, Buenos Aires. Caption information courtesy Bob Tetault, an analyst at the Foreign Agricultural Service at the US Department of Agriculture.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Argentina

As the summer begins in the southern hemisphere, farmers in Argentina are facing difficult decisions. The soil in some of the most important crop growing areas is dry, and that has delayed planting. Analysts at the US Department of Agricultures Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) predict below-average yields for corn, sunflower seeds, sorghum, and peanuts. The most severe drought and subsequent planting delay is in the Cordoba Province, image left. Corn is typically planted in this area, but the delay has shortened the growing season. Farmers can plant late and expect a smaller harvest, plant corn for silage, or plant another crop such as soybeans. Many have already switched to soybeans, the FAS reports. The shortened growing season may also decrease the soybean yield, but with more soybeans planted than normal, the harvest should be larger than average. Even harder hit are the peanut and sorghum crops. Sorghum production is expected to be 25 percent lower than last season, and peanuts could be down by 10 percent from last season. These true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images show the contrast between this year and last year. Large tan regions in the image taken on November 20, 2003 indicate less vegetation than the image taken on November 15, 2002. Though rains in the first week of December brought relief to this region, more moisture is still needed for developing crops. On the left side of the image, the Rio de la Plata forms the border with Uruguay. The cement-colored patch on the western shore is the Argentine capital city, Buenos Aires. Caption information courtesy Bob Tetault, an analyst at the Foreign Agricultural Service at the US Department of Agriculture.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in northern Argentina

Scattered fires (marked with red dots) burned across northern Argentina on November 11, 2002, and were detected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite. The location of active fires is marked on the true-color image collected by MODIS at the same time. Spring is firmly underway in the Pampas region of Argentina in the eastern portion of the image. The Pampas is a wide, mostly treeless grassland plain that rises from the Atlantic coast in the east up to the Andes Mountains along the countryswestern border with Chile. The eastern, more coastal portion of the pampas is called the Humid, or Wet, Pampas, while the western regions that approach the Andes are get less precipitation and are called the Dry Pampas. The Humid Pampas is used for farmland, while the Dry Pampas is used for ranching. The transition between the two Pampas can be seen quite easily in the lower left hand quadrant, where lush green wetlands line the Parana River as it runs south through the great plain. To the west of the river, the lush appearance fades quickly to green speckles amid a tan landscape. In the high resolution imagery, the speckles reveal themselves as small rectangles—irrigated plots of land. Southeast of image center, sun glint on La Mar Chiquita (Little Sea) gives it a gray-green appearance, and the calm waters reveal the pattern of MODIS scan lines. To the northeast of the lake are two large salt deserts. The southern one called Salinas Grandes, the northern one called Salinas de Ambargasta. The Andes Mountains run north-south along the western portion of the image, their high peaks covered with snow even though summer is set to arrive in just a month. Across the Andes in Chile, the city of Santiago makes a grayish patch in the lower left hand corner of the image.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in northern Argentina

Red dots mark the locations of fires in northern Argentina in this true-color image. Based on the locations of the fires in tan and light green regions of cleared land versus the dark green of the forest in the top of the image, it is likely that they were started to manage agricultural land. Tan squares within the dark green forest show where land has been cleared. The irregular white regions in the lower left corner of the image are salt pans left by seasonal lakes. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite on July 10, 2004.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in northern Argentina

Clusters of fires, marked with red dots, burn in northern Argentina in this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image taken by the Aqua satellite on November 13, 2003. The largest fires, located in the brown peaks of the Sierras de Cordoba southeast of Laguna Mar Chiquita, are sending white plumes of smoke to the south. The smaller fires to the north were probably deliberately set to clear land for farming. Tan boxes inside the dark green sub-tropical forests in the north show where the land has already been cleared. The image shows three of Argentinas four major climatic regions. Just visible on the right edge of the image is the arid region along the shadowed side of the Andes Mountains. Subtropical forests appear dark green on the top center of the image. The lighter green lowlands on the left are fertile plains and marshlands. In the south are the “Pampas,” a mix of humid and dry grasslands used for grazing. The fourth climatic region, Patagonia, is not visible in this image. It is made up of high prairies and glaciers along the southern tip of South America.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in Argentina

These images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) show fires (red dots) in Argentina in January 2003. Across the Pampas, which is a large, relatively flat grassland (image right), a few small fires were detected, while to the south, larger fires were burning and producing grayish smoke plumes. In southern Argentina, the rainy season comes in the winter (Northern Hemisphere summer), and fire season continues from late spring into early summer (Northern Hemisphere fall and winter).
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in Argentina

These images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) show fires (red dots) in Argentina in January 2003. Across the Pampas, which is a large, relatively flat grassland (image right), a few small fires were detected, while to the south, larger fires were burning and producing grayish smoke plumes. In southern Argentina, the rainy season comes in the winter (Northern Hemisphere summer), and fire season continues from late spring into early summer (Northern Hemisphere fall and winter).
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC