Satellite Image, Photo of Panama

A few dozen fires (marked in red) burn in Panama, the narrow strip of land that connects North to South America. The fires add hazy clouds of grayish-blue smoke to the air, casting a haze over the Gulf of Panama and the Pacific Ocean. Off to the left, a bright streak of sliver crosses from the Pacific to the Caribbean Sea; this streak, called sun glint, is caused by the reflection of the sun on the water. The brighter (less diffuse) the silver, the calmer the water´s surface, and vice-versa. Panama´s most famous feature, the Panama Canal, is visible almost at image-center stretching between Colon and Panama City. Colon is located on the shores of the Caribbean Sea just west of the peak of Panama´s curve, while Panama City is located to the southeast on the Gulf of Panama. The Panama Canal is strategically very important, being the only crossing point from the Atlantic and Pacific without going south around the tip of South America via Drake Passage; a notoriously dangerous stretch of sea. This true-color Aqua MODIS image was acquired on March 28, 2003.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in Panama

A few dozen fires (marked in red) burn in Panama, the narrow strip of land that connects North to South America. The fires add hazy clouds of grayish-blue smoke to the air, casting a haze over the Gulf of Panama and the Pacific Ocean. Off to the left, a bright streak of sliver crosses from the Pacific to the Caribbean Sea; this streak, called sun glint, is caused by the reflection of the sun on the water. The brighter (less diffuse) the silver, the calmer the water´s surface, and vice-versa. Panama´s most famous feature, the Panama Canal, is visible almost at image-center stretching between Colon and Panama City. Colon is located on the shores of the Caribbean Sea just west of the peak of Panama´s curve, while Panama City is located to the southeast on the Gulf of Panama. The Panama Canal is strategically very important, being the only crossing point from the Atlantic and Pacific without going south around the tip of South America via Drake Passage; a notoriously dangerous stretch of sea. This true-color Aqua MODIS image was acquired on March 28, 2003.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Satellite Image, Photo of Panama Isthmus, Panama

Extending east-west about 400 miles (640 km) from the border of Costa Rica to the border of Colombia. The connection between North and South America and separates theAtlantic Ocean from the Pacific Ocean. The narrowest part of the Americas (about 30-120 miles [50-200 km] wide).
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Satellite Image, Photo of Azuero Peninsula, Panama

Region of the south west of Panama, protruding south into the Pacific Ocean between the Gulf of Panama to the east and the Gulf of Montijo to the west, app. 60 miles (100 km) from east to west and 55 miles (90 km) from north to south.
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Satellite Image, Photo of Panama´s Rainforests

Tropical rainforests are warm, 24-27C (75-80F) year round, because they are located near the equator. Rainforests live up to their name-they receive at least 2,000 mm (80 inches) of rain every year. While they cover less than seven percent of the Earth's surface, rainforests contain about half of the plant and animal species on the planet. The rainforests of Panama, in particular, are some of the world's most biologically diverse areas. Chagres National Park, situated east of Gatun Lake and the northern half of Panama Canal, has 1,185 species of plants, 130 of which are unique to that area. Panama's rainforests are home to many mammals that migrated from both North and South America. Among these species are jaguars, tapirs, deer, sloths, anteaters, and armadillos. There are also 650 species of birds and 93 amphibian species in the Panama Canal watershed..
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Satellite Image, Photo of Panama Canal, Caribbean, Pacific Ocean

The Panama Canal is a 50-mile long engineering wonder connecting the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean. Completed by the United States in 1914, it runs southeastward from Colon, through the man-made Gatun Lake, to Panama City on the Pacific side of the Isthmus of Panama. The canal, a major artery of international shipping, uses a series of massive locks, manmade lakes, and water supplied by the copious tropical rainfall of the region to lift and lower transiting ships a height of 85 feet over the continental divide.Thick rainforests border the canal, and the protected Canal Zone is easily delineated by the dark green band of forest, which contrast the lighter green cultivated areas of Panama. The ecologically sensitive Canal Zone supports diverse lowland rainforest that is crucial for water balance and erosion/siltation control around the canal. Scientists monitor the edges of the Canal Zone rainforest for degradation from development.The crew of the International Space Station acquired this image on the afternoon of January 30, 2003, using an electronic still camera with 85 mm lens. Fair-weather cumulus clouds from the Caribbean can be seen pouring southward through the natural gap in this mountain chain of Central America.
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Satellite Image, Photo of Gatun Lake, Panama

Artificial lake formed by damming the Chagres River and its smaller affluents, app. 166 square miles (430 square km), being part of the Panama Canal system).
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA