Tropical Storm Erika over Mexico

The MODIS instrument onboard NASA´s Aqua spacecraft captured this bird´s-eye view of Tropical Storm Erika as the storm struck northern Mexico with gusty winds and heavy rains. Erika was moving towards the west at 18 mph with sustained winds of 70 mph. At the time this image was taken, rainfall amounts of up to six inches were being reported across northern Mexico and southern Texas.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Western Mexico

The two arms of the Sierra Madre Mountains — Occidental (west) and Oriental (east) — march south through Mexico, holding between them the high, largely arid Mexican Plateau. This plateau is roughly 1,130 kilometers long (~ 700 miles), and ranges from 1,220 to 2,440 meters high (4,000 - 8,000 feet). What water there is on the Plateau has no outlet to the sea, and so collects in drainage basins that today are the home of a number of Mexicos major cities. A number of large cities are visible in this true-color Aqua MODIS image. About 75 kilometers due east of the group of fires in the upper left corner is the city of Chihuahua, which perches on the western side of the plateau near the Occidental range. On the opposite side of the plateau and about 550 kilometers southeast, two cities face each other from opposite sides of the Oriental range: Saltillo (west) and Monterrey (east). At the southern end of the plateau, a number of cities can be seen. The large grey dot north of Laguna de Chapala is Guadalajara, one of Mexicos foremost cities. In the lower right corner of the image is the capital itself, Mexico City. Scattered throughout this image from December 22, 2003, are a number of fires (marked in red). Southwestern Texas is visible in the upper right corner of the image, while the Pacific Ocean occupies the lower left.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in southern Mexico

On April 24, 2004, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite captured this image of southern Mexico and numerous fires (red dots) burning the region around Lake Chapala (top, left of center). The widespread nature of the fires, the time of year, and their location (generally located away from natural vegetation, which appears deeper green) suggests that these fires are being set intentionally for agricultural purposes. Though not necessarily immediately hazardous, such large-scale burning can have a strong impact on weather, climate, human health, and natural resources.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in southern Mexico

On May 1, 2004, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite captured this image along with numerous fire detections (marked in yellow) across southern Mexico. Dozens of fires are scattered across the states of Jalisco (roughly upper left quadrant of image), Michoacan (center and right), and Guerrero (bottom right). At the right edge, fires were detected just north of Mexico City. The widespread nature of the fires and the time of year suggest that these fires are being set intentionally for agricultural purposes. Though not necessarily hazardous, such large-scale burning can have a strong impact on weather, climate, human health, and natural resources.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Tropical Storm Claudette, Gulf of Mexico

On July 13, 2003, the MODIS instrument onboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured this bird’s-eye view of Tropical Storm Claudette churning in the warm Gulf of Mexico waters. At the time of this image Claudette was centered near 25.3 north latitude and 92.4 west longititude, or about 315 miles east of Brownsville, Texas. Air Force Reserve Unit Reconnaissance aircraft were reporting maximum sustained winds were near 60 mph with a minimum central pressure of 996 millibars.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Dust storm in central Mexico

A streak of red dust blows from the base of the Sierra Madre Mountains in northern Mexico in this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) image, acquired by NASAs Aqua satellite on March 4, 2004. Red dots mark the locations of active fires.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Satellite Image, Photo of Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico

Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico November 1997. The folded, rugged, Sierra Madre Oriental (eastern), a southern extension of the Rocky Mountains of the United States and Canada, can be seen in this west-northwest view. The Sierra Madre Oriental is the boundary of the dissected eastern edge of the High Mexican Central Plateau and the Gulf coastal plain. Beginning as barren hills south of the Rio Grande in northeastern Mexico, the Sierra Madre Oriental extend generally southward approximately 700 miles (1125 km), to near 19 degrees north latitude paralleling the coast of the western Gulf of Mexico. The average elevation of the mountain range is 7000 feet (2135 meters) with some peaks exceeding 10000 feet (3050 meters). A wealth of minerals including iron ore, lead, silver, and gold, are extracted from the mountain range. The city of Monterey, Mexico is discernible just inward toward the center from the left center of the image. Clouds cover the coastal plain in the bottom third of the image.
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Northern Mexico

This pair of true-color images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows northern and southern Mexico in late 2002. In northern Mexico, a high plateau known as the altiplano is centered between the eastern and western Sierra Madre Mountain Ranges. The Baja California Peninsula can be seen at left. At bottom right of that image, Mexico City makes a large, grayish patch against the green landscape. Northeast of Mexico is Texas. In the image from December, the southern portion of Mexico is shown, emphasizing the fertile coastal plain along the Campeche Bay in the Gulf of Mexico (center). Right of center is the Yucatan Peninsula. At bottom right, the Chiapas region of Mexico meets the border of northwest Guatemala.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC