Cloud streets in the Greenland Sea

Cloud streets flow off the coast of Greenland in this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image captured by the Terra satellite on March 29, 2003. Over the ocean, clouds will often become aligned with the direction of a low-level wind, producing parallel rows, or streets, of clouds such as the pattern seen in this image.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Southern Greenland

Off of Greenland’s southern coast, sea ice swirls in a giant spiral in the northern Atlantic Ocean in late May, 2004. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image, taken by the Terra satellite, shows the ice streaming down off of the eastern coast and around the southern point. Thin clouds stream over the swirling ice in the lower left portion of the image, though the skies over the land remains clear. Snow covers the main body of Greenland, but summer temperatures keep the much of the shoreline clear, allowing the brown earth to show through and contrast against the blue waters in the fjords. This image is from May 29, 2004.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Northeast coast of Greenland

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) on NASAs Terra satellite captured this true-color image of the ruggedly beautiful northeast coast of Greenland on July 10, 2004. Clouds swirl over the dark blue Greenland Sea in which chunks of ice float. In the top center of the image, a horn of ice, called Flade Isblink, extends east away from the coast. A dark smudge of wind-blown gravel is visible near the base of the ice sheet. Strong winter winds blow the gravel from the land out over the sea. Now, in July, the winter snow has melted, making the remaining gravel visible on top of the ice.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Northern Greenland

Summer in Greenland provided this cloud-free view of the island’s craggy northern shores. Though ice was still present in the Arctic Sea on July 26, 2004, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image, the ice appears to be breaking up, and a dark finger of clear water is creeping around the east of the island, right. It is in these icy waters that the northernmost point of land in the world is located. The tiny island that bears this designation is too small to be seen in this image, but it is located north of Peary Land, the tan-colored arch of mainland Greenland extends north of the rest of the island.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Southern Greenland

Snow and ice recede from the western side of southern Greenland in this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) image, acquired by the Aqua satellite on August 7, 2004. As summer settles over the Northern Hemisphere, increased temperatures bring a brief growing season to even remote landscapes. But despite the warmer conditions, Greenlands ice sheet continues to dominate the interior of the huge island. In the higher resolutions of this image, icebergs and chunks of sea ice salt the deep blue waters of the Northern Atlantic, especially in the waters off the islands western coast. In the fjords, melting ice and snow carry sediments with them, which turn the water shades of tan, green, and turquoise. On the eastern face of Greenland, sea ice gathers like foam along the edge of the island.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Eastern coast of Greenland

This true-color MODIS image, which was acquired on June 5, 2001, shows the eastern coast of Greenland.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

East coast of Greenland

This MODIS true-color image shows ice breaking up around the eastern coast of Greenland.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

Southern Greenland

This MODIS true-color image shows the southern and southeastern coasts of Greenland.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team