Ash plume from Ambrym Volcano, Vanuatu

In the South Pacific Ocean east of Australia, the 83 islands that make up the Vanuatu nation are dotted with countless craters from active and extinct volcanoes. Among the most dangerous is the almost-permanently active Ambrym Volcano. In this pair of images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) captured by the Terra satellite on April 27, 2004, a large plume of volcanic ash is blowing westward from the volcano, which appears at the center right edge. The plume is mixing with clouds, and is more apparent as a bright, reddish orange color in the false-color image.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Ash plume from Ambrym Volcano, Vanuatu

In the South Pacific Ocean east of Australia, the 83 islands that make up the Vanuatu nation are dotted with countless craters from active and extinct volcanoes. Among the most dangerous is the almost-permanently active Ambrym Volcano. In this pair of images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) captured by the Terra satellite on April 27, 2004, a large plume of volcanic ash is blowing westward from the volcano, which appears at the center right edge. The plume is mixing with clouds, and is more apparent as a bright, reddish orange color in the false-color image.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Ash plume from Ambrym Volcano, Vanuatu

In the South Pacific Ocean east of Australia, the 83 islands that make up the Vanuatu nation are dotted with countless craters from active and extinct volcanoes. Among the most dangerous is the almost-permanently active Ambrym Volcano. In this pair of images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) captured by the Terra satellite on April 27, 2004, a large plume of volcanic ash is blowing westward from the volcano, which appears at the center right edge. The plume is mixing with clouds, and is more apparent as a bright, reddish orange color in the false-color image.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Ash plume from Ambrym Volcano, Vanuatu

The Ambrym Volcano was billowing ash and steam on October 4, 2004, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image. Located on Ambrym Island in Vanuatu approximately 2,200 kilometers northeast of Australia, the volcano is one of the region’s most active, with regular eruptions nearly every year in recent history. Red dots on top of the volcano indicate that MODIS also detected a thermal anomaly associated with the eruption. This could be hot ash, lava, or fires started by the erupting volcano.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Tropical Cyclone Zoe (06P) northeast of Vanuatu, South Pacific Ocean

In this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from December 29, 2002, Tropical Cyclone Zoe was located near 13.0S and 169.9E. The cyclone was moving southeast at about 5 knots and was slowly weakening in intensity. Maximum 10-minute average winds near the centre were estimated at 110 knots. Zoe has weakened further over the last 6 hours. The eye continues to contract and is beginning to become cloud filled. The cyclone is expected to turn more south-southeast as it is influenced by a mid-level subtropical ridge to the southwest.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Tropical Cyclone Zoe (06P) northeast of Vanuatu, South Pacific Ocean

In this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from December 27, Tropical Cyclone Zoe was located near 11.8S and 170.2E. The storm was moving west-southwest at about 7 knots but was expected to gradually turn to the southwest. Maximum 10-minute average winds near the center are estimated at 125 knots and are expected to increase to 135 knots in the next 12 hours.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC