Satellite Image, Photo of Cuba

Dozens of fires were burning on Cuba on April 3, 2004, and were detected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite. The fire locations are marked in red. The widespread nature of the fires and the season suggests that these fires are being set intentionally for agricultural purposes. Though not necessarily hazardous, such large-scale burning can have a strong impact on weather, climate, human health, and natural resources.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Tropical Storm Isidore south of Cuba

With maximum sustained winds close to 105 mph (165 km/hr), Hurricane Isidore wreaked havoc on the island nation of Cuba. The center of the storm is located about 65 miles eat of the western tip of Cuba. Isidore is moving towards the west-northwest near 8 mph (13 km/hr). These MODIS true-color images were acquired on September 20 and 21, 2002, after which Isidore turned almost due west and made landfall on Mexico’s southern coasts and moved inland along the Yucatan Peninsula. After that, Isidore turned once more to the north, and by Monday, September 23 had moved back into the Gulf of Mexico. A tropical storm warning (instead of a hurricane warning) was put into effect by the Mexican government from Cabo Catoche (near where the peninsula joins the mainland) to Veracruz (halfway between Cabo Catoche and the Mexico/US-Texas border).
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Hurricane Charley (03L) off Cuba

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured this true-color image of Hurricane Charley on August 12, 2004, at 11:55 a.m. EDT. At the time this image was taken, Charley had maximum sustained winds near 90 mph with higher gusts and was moving toward the northwest at 17 mph.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Hurricane Ivan (09L) off Cuba (afternoon overpass)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) aboard NASAs Aqua satellite captured this true-color image of Hurricane Ivan on September 13, 2004, at 19:00 UTC (3:00 PM EDT). At the time this image was taken Ivan was located approximately 110 km (70 miles) south-southeast of the western tip of Cuba and was moving towards the northwest at 13 km/hr (8 mph). Ivan had maximum sustained winds of 260 km/hr (160 mph) with higher gusts.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Hurricane Isidore over Cuba

With maximum sustained winds close to 105 mph (165 km/hr), Hurricane Isidore is wreaking havoc on the island nation of Cuba. The center of the storm is located about 65 miles eat of the western tip of Cuba. Isidore is moving towards the west-northwest near 8 mph (13 km/hr). Since this MODIS true-color image was acquired on September 20, 2002, Isidore turned almost due west and made landfall on Mexico’s southern coasts and moved inland along the Yucatan Peninsula. After that, Isidore turned once more to the north, and by Monday, September 23 had moved back into the Gulf of Mexico. A tropical storm warning (instead of a hurricane warning) was put into effect by the Mexican government from Cabo Catoche (near where the peninsula joins the mainland) to Veracruz (halfway between Cabo Catoche and the Mexico/US-Texas border).
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Hurricane Michelle reaching the south coast of Cuba

Hurricane Michelle made landfall in Cuba on Sunday, November 4, with sustained winds of 135 miles per hour. Cuban media reported that at least 5 people died in the storm and more than 600,000 people were evacuated, primarily in the Matanzas province near Pinar del Rio. Cuban officials report severe damages to property and crops in the wake of the storm. This true-color image of Hurricane Michelle was acquired on November 4 around 10:30 a.m. local time, just as the eye of the storm was approaching Cubas southwestern coast. The scene was captured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASAs Terra satellite. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) also acquired a pair of scenes over the Gulf of Batabano, where the storm churned up a lot of sediment. According to the National Weather Service, at 4 p.m. on November 5, Hurricane Michelle was located about 145 miles (230 km) east-northeast of Nassau in the Bahamas. The storm was moving away from the Bahamas as was slowly weakening. At that time, its winds were about 75 miles per hour.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Hurricane Michelle

This is SeaWiFS view of Hurricane Michelle as she passed over Cuba on her way northeastward on November 4, 2001. Also visible in this image are clouds of smoke from numerous fires along the western edge of the Appalachian mountains.
Source: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

Hurricane Michelle Aftereffects

This before and after pair of SeaWiFS images illustrates how a hurricane can stir bottom sediments into the water column. The first image was collected on October 24, 2001, and the second image was collected November 5, 2001 just after Hurricane Michelle had passed through the area. The center of the hurricane is still visible in the upper left corner of the November 5 image. The most noticeable change is in the Gulf of Batabano between the western end of Guba and the Isle of Youth. On October 24, the water was clear enough to reveal features on the ocean floor. After the hurricane passed, the water because milky and opaque--hiding our view of the bottom. Similar increases in turbidity can be seen farther east in the Gulf of Ana Maria, around the Florida Keys, and over Great Bahama Bank just at the edge of the hurricane.
Source: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

Hurricane Lili

As was the case with Hurricane Isidore roughly two weeks ago, Hurricane Lili is bearing down on western Cuba. In this image, Lili is centered near 21.8 north longitude and 83.7 west latitude. Lili is moving towards the west-northwest near 13 mph (20 km/hr), and this motion is expected to continue with an increase in forward speed during the next 24 hours. Maximum sustained winds are near 90 mph (150 km/hr) with higher gusts. Storm surges of 8 to 10 feet above normal tide levels are expected along the south coast of western Cuba.
Source: Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

Isidore Brings Heavy Rains to Cuba

This false-color image shows total cumulative rainfall produced by Hurricane Isidore from September 17-23, 2002. Isidore tracked south of Cuba and produced between 20 (green pixels) and 40 (red pixels) inches or rain over western Cuba, the Isle of Youth, and adjacent waters before passing into the Gulf of Mexico. Click the image above to view the time-series animation. These images were acquired by the NASA/NASDA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission.
Source: Image courtesy Hal Pierce, NASA GSFC Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Branch (Code 912). For more information and other examples of TRMM data, visit the TRMM Web site