Dust storm off Pakistan

The Aqua MODIS instrument captured this true-color image of a dust storm in Pakistan on April 26, 2003. The plume of dust blows south and eventually dissipates over the Arabian Sea. Just visible in the northwestern corner of the image is southeastern Afghanistan, and in the southeast corner is a small part of western India. The Pakistan-India border shown here lies in the Indus River Valley, an area that has cities dating back to 3500 BC.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

The Indus River Valley, Pakistan

This pair of true- and false-color images feature the Indus River Valley, a lush oasis of vegetation made possible by the Indus River, which is visible as a thin black thread heading toward the Arabian Sea in the false-color image. The Indus River has its roots in the Tibetan Himalayas, and is fed from melting snows from three major mountain ranges and five Indian rivers. The Indus River valley was the home of a great ancient civilization - the Indus Valley Civilization - that lasted for about a thousand years and at its height controlled more territory than ancient Egypt or Mesopotamia. In the false-color image, black represents water, while vegetation appears bright green, and the arid mountains and plains appear shades of tan and orange. Turquoise-blue represents high-level ice clouds that are difficult to see in the true-color image. These images were acquired on February 5, 2003, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua satellite.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

The Indus River Valley, Pakistan

This pair of true- and false-color images feature the Indus River Valley, a lush oasis of vegetation made possible by the Indus River, which is visible as a thin black thread heading toward the Arabian Sea in the false-color image. The Indus River has its roots in the Tibetan Himalayas, and is fed from melting snows from three major mountain ranges and five Indian rivers. The Indus River valley was the home of a great ancient civilization - the Indus Valley Civilization - that lasted for about a thousand years and at its height controlled more territory than ancient Egypt or Mesopotamia. In the false-color image, black represents water, while vegetation appears bright green, and the arid mountains and plains appear shades of tan and orange. Turquoise-blue represents high-level ice clouds that are difficult to see in the true-color image. These images were acquired on February 5, 2003, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua satellite.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Dust storm across Pakistan

Thick streamers of dust blew out of Pakistan on December 19, 2004. The dust storm appears to be originating near the base of the Chagai Hills near the border with Afghanistan and to the south in the hilly coastland between the Makran Coast Range and the Arabian Sea. This true-color image was acquired on December 19, 2004 by NASA’s Terra satellite.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Dust storm in Pakistan

&This true-color Terra MODIS image from August 12, 2002, features a dust storm blowing from the southern Afghanistan-Iran border, south across the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, then curving back northwards along Pakistans Balochistan Plateau and Siahan Range. Just north of the dark orange desert inside Afghanistan (upper center) is the city of Kandahar, and just southwest of where the three nation.s borders meet is the Iranian city of Zahedan. The region is home to a variety of landscapes. high mountains (including K2 in northern Pakistan), inhospitable plateaus, harsh deserts, arid steppes, alpine fields, and alluvial plains. The large green swath of vegetation in southeastern Pakistan (bottom right edge) lies east of the Kirthar Range along the Indus River, which eventually empties into the Arabian Sea.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Dust over the Arabian Sea

These true-color sceneS show a heavy dust storm blowing along Pakistan’s southern coast and out over the Arabian Sea on December 14, 2003. Much of the dust appears to be coming from the Great Indian Desert along the Pakistani-Indian border, image right. The first scene was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA’s Terra satellite. The MODIS sensor aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired the second image later that same day.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Dust over the Arabian Sea

These true-color sceneS show a heavy dust storm blowing along Pakistan’s southern coast and out over the Arabian Sea on December 14, 2003. Much of the dust appears to be coming from the Great Indian Desert along the Pakistani-Indian border, image right. The first scene was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA’s Terra satellite. The MODIS sensor aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired the second image later that same day.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Indus River Valley

The Indus River valley courses through Pakistan and empties into the Arabian Sea in this SeaWiFS image.
Source: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

Deadly Heat Wave in Pakistan

CERES measured the thermal energy emitted from the regions of the Indian subcontinent and northern Africa, as shown in this image from May 2001. The heat wave in Pakistan that killed at least 33 people the weekend of May 5-6 is seen in yellow as a region emitting high values of thermal energy. What do the colors mean? The smallest amount of Earths radiation emitted to space is shown in white over Greenland and Antarctica. The levels of energy increase from blue to red to yellow. The greatest amounts of heat emitted are from the Sahara Desert and the Arabian Peninsula. Cold, blue-colored temperature ranges are found not only at high latitudes, but also in the tropics from cloud tops of thunderstorm systems so extensive that they span thousands of miles. For more information, see the CERES Press Release on the Earth Observatory.
Source: Data courtesy Bruce Wielicki and Takmeng Wong, and the CERES Science Team at NASA Langley Research Center; Images courtesy Tom Bridgman, NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio

Karakoram Range, Pakistan

The Baltoro Glacier in northeast Pakistan runs through the center of the second tallest mountain range on Earth—the Karakoram. At 8,611 m (28,251 ft) K2 is the tallest mountain in the region, and three others within 20 km top 8,000 m. The Karakoram and the Himalaya are important to Earth scientists for several reasons. They are one of the worlds most geologically active areas, at the boundary between two colliding continents. Therefore, they are important in the study of plate tectonics. Mountain glaciers may serve as an indicator of climate change, advancing and receding with long-term changes in temperature and precipitation. These extensive ranges may have even caused climate change when they were formed over 40 million years ago. The large amounts of rock exposed to the atmosphere are weathered (broken down) by carbon dioxide. This process removes the greenhouse gas from the atmosphere, and could have caused the global climate to cool, triggering an ongoing series of ice ages. This image, from February 14, 2000, was aquired by EarthKAM, a NASA sponsored program that provides stunning, high-quality photographs of our planet taken from the Space Shuttle and from the International Space Station. Since 1996, EarthKAM students have taken thousands of photographs of the Earth by using the World Wide Web to direct a digital camera flown on the Space Shuttle.
Source: Annotations by Robert Simmon, NASA GSFC, image from EarthKAM