Odd cloud in Kazakhstan

This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows an interesting cloud draped over Kazakhstan. The center of the cloud seems to bear a keyhole.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Dust storm in Kazakhstan

North of the Caspian Sea (bottom) in Kazakhstan, a dust storm was blowing over the arid plains on April 9, 2003. The swath of dust is sharply defined on its eastern end, and trails off to the northwest. At the western edge of the Caspian Sea, fires (red dots) were detected in the Volga River Delta by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in western Kazakhstan

At the northern end of the stony deserts scattered across the Ustyurt Plateau between the Caspian Sea (left edge) and the Aral Sea (right) in southern Kazakhstan, several large fires were detected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on June 20, 2004. Areas where the sensor detected active fires are marked in red. The western group of fires is divided in the center by the Emba River, which flows southwestward toward the Caspian Sea.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Balqash Koli, Kazakhstan

This image of crescent-shaped Lake Balkhash in eastern Kazakhstan, north of the Tian-Shan Mountains was taken by MODIS. The Ili River flows into the western end of the lake, filling it with bright sediment. This sediment highlights the difference between the freshwater western side of the lake and the saline eastern side. A sandbar prevents mixing between the lakes two sections.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

Balqash Koli, Kazakhstan

This true-color MODIS image shows Lake Balkhash in Kazakhstan. The large river at the southwestern end of the lake is the Ili River. To its northeast is the Karatol River. Lake Balkhash has no outlets, and it is highly saline as a result. At the bottom of the image is Ysyk Kol, a large mountain lake in Kyrgyzstan.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

Floods along the Syr Darya River, Kazakhstan

Winter ice and a failure to observe regional water use agreements trigged floods along the mighty Syr Darya River in Southern Kazakhstan. At least 200 families living in communities around Qyzylorda, shown here, were forced to evacuate when the river burst its banks. The Syr Darya is an important resource in Central Asia, providing water for farming and hydroelectric power. In early January, representatives from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan met to plan water usage to prevent regional flooding. In early February, Kyrgystan sent a higher volume of water than agreed from its hydroelectric power station into the Chardara Reservoir on the border of the three countries. Uzbekistan had agreed to accept extra water in its Arnasay Reservoir, located just west of the Chardara, but did not take as much as required. As a result, the Chardara filled, and Kazak officials sent the extra water down the Syr Darya River. The River, already constricted by ice, could not take the extra water and overflowed. This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows the flooded area as seen by the Terra satellite on February 10, 2004. Ice, which is light blue in the false-color image, lines sections of the Rivers original channel. The flood water, a darker shade of blue, expands around the ice-defined banks of the River. Clouds in this image are light blue and white, vegetation is green, and bare soil is pink.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Floods along the Syr Darya River, Kazakhstan (false color)

Winter ice and a failure to observe regional water use agreements trigged floods along the mighty Syr Darya River in Southern Kazakhstan. At least 200 families living in communities around Qyzylorda, shown here, were forced to evacuate when the river burst its banks. The Syr Darya is an important resource in Central Asia, providing water for farming and hydroelectric power. In early January, representatives from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan met to plan water usage to prevent regional flooding. In early February, Kyrgystan sent a higher volume of water than agreed from its hydroelectric power station into the Chardara Reservoir on the border of the three countries. Uzbekistan had agreed to accept extra water in its Arnasay Reservoir, located just west of the Chardara, but did not take as much as required. As a result, the Chardara filled, and Kazak officials sent the extra water down the Syr Darya River. The River, already constricted by ice, could not take the extra water and overflowed. This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows the flooded area as seen by the Terra satellite on February 10, 2004. Ice, which is light blue in the false-color image, lines sections of the Rivers original channel. The flood water, a darker shade of blue, expands around the ice-defined banks of the River. Clouds in this image are light blue and white, vegetation is green, and bare soil is pink.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Dust storm over the Aral Sea

On April 18, 2003, strong southwesterly winds were blowing dust and sand from the deserts of Kazakhstan out over the Aral Sea. The above true-color image of the dust plume was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, flying aboard NASA.s Aqua spacecraft.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Lake Balkhash, Kazakhstan

Lake Balkhash in eastern Kazakhstan is a bright turquoise green in this true-color Terra MODIS image from October 10, 2002. Feeding into the lake from the south are the Ili (on the left), Karatol (middle), Aksu, and Lepsy (right) Rivers. Partially covered by clouds are the Alakol (right edge) and Kapchagayskoye Vodokhranilishche (bottom center) Lakes.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Lake Balkhash, Kazakhstan

This series of images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra and Aqua satellites shows the break up and melting of seasonal ice in Lake Balkhash in southeastern Kazakhstan. The crescent-shaped lake is fresh water in the western half and saline in the east. The Ili River feeds the freshwater end, the Karatol flows in east of center, and the Aksu and Lepsy Rivers flow in at the eastern end. At the lower right of the images are the snow-covered peaks of the foothills of the Tien Shan Mountains. In several images, fires have been detected and are marked with red dots. The series of images runs from early April through May 2003.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC