Japan

The islands of Japan are shown clearly off the coast of North and South Korea, China, and Russia in this true-color image. Running down through the islands are a string of mountains that make up part of the Pacific “Ring of Fire.” The Ring of Fire is a zone of frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions that stretches in a series of arcs from New Zealand, through Indonesia, up through the Philippines, Japan, the Kuril Islands and Kamchatka Peninsula (Russia), across the Pacific Ocean via the Aleutian Islands, and down the coast of the Americas. Seventy-five percent of the world´s volcanoes are in this ring, making it the most volcanically-active region on the planet. Also shown in this image are a number of fires, which are marked with red dots. A few fires were detected in Japan, China, and North Korea, but the majority were detected in Russia´s Primorskiy-Kray region. This true-color Aqua MODIS image was acquired on May 1, 2003.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Typhoon Etau (11W) over Japan

The MODIS instrument on NASA’s Aqua spacecraft captured this bird’s-eye view of Typhoon Etau as it was battering Kyushu, the southernmost of Japan’s four main islands, with torrential rains and strong winds. At the time of this image Etau was packing sustained winds of 90 kilometers per hour and was expected to dump as much as 70 cm (27 inches) of rain over the next 24 hours over southern Japan. Etau means storm cloud in the language of the Pacific island Palau.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Typhoon Choi-Wan approaching Japan

This true-color image shows Typhoon Choi-Wan about 490 miles southwest of Tokyo, Japan on September 21, 2003. Though Tokyo was braced for the storm, Choi-Wan turned east to skirt the edge of the island. The news reported little damage from the storms rains and 78 mile-per-hour winds. “Choi-wan” is Cantonese for “colorful clouds.” The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASAs Terra satellite captured this image.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires on Kyushu Island, Japan

This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from the Aqua satellite on March 21, 2003, shows fires (red dots) smoking in central Kyushu Island in southern Japan.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Japan

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite captured this stunning view of Japan’ four largest islands on February 20, 2004. The snow-covered southern arm of Hokkaido extends into the upper left corner. Honshu, Japan’s largest island, curves across the center of the image. Shikoku, right, and Kyushu, left, form the southern tip of the group. Japan is mostly mountainous, and, as the dusting of snow in this image shows, is cold in the north and more tropical in the south. A single red dot marks the location of an active fire.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Japan

Only a few small clouds hover over Japan’s main island, Honshu, in this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image captured as the Terra satellite flew over on the morning of April 21, 2004. To the south, the smaller islands Kyushu (right) and Shikoku (left) are also clearly visible. A few red dots mark the locations of active fires. Near the fire burning on the northern tip of Honshu, the wind appears to be pushing a tan plume of dust into the Pacific Ocean.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Ash plume from Mount Asama, Japan

On September 1, 2004, Japans Mt. Asama erupted explosively. After a two-week rest, the volcano continued its eruption in several small bursts starting on September 14, sending plumes of ash from the its 2,568 meter-high summit crater. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) on NASAs Terra satellite captured this view of the smoking volcano at 10:30 a.m. Tokyo time on September 16, 2004. In this image, the ash plume is heading due south towards Suruga Bay. This eruption is not unusual—Asama is the most active volcano on Honshu, Japans main island. Its last eruption was in 2003, though the current eruption is its most violent since 1983. Over 50 distinct eruptions have been recorded since 685 AD. About 140 kilometers to the southeast, Tokyo is the cement-colored region around the Bay of Tokyo. The metropolitan area is the worlds most populated, with over 28 million residents. The city is also one of the most expensive and modern in the world, since land space is at a premium and natural disasters spur (re)building.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Typhoon Etau (11W) south of Japan

The MODIS instrument onboard NASAs Terra spacecraft captured this birds-eye view of Typhoon Etau as it was buffeting the southern island chain of Okinawa, affecting airlines, a refinery and other industries. In this image the center of Etau is located just north of Nago city and is moving north at 20 kilometers per hour with sustained winds of 144 kilometers per hour. Forecasters are predicting the storm will reach Kagoshima city on Kyushu island tomorrow and then veer off to the Sea of Japan, avoiding Tokyo.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Typhoon Rusa (21W) south of Japan

In this series of true-color images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Typhoon Rusa can be seen menacing first Japan and then Korea. The series includes images captured by the Terra and Aqua MODIS instruments between August 27 and August 31, 2002.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Typhoon Rusa (21W) south of Japan

In this series of true-color images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Typhoon Rusa can be seen menacing first Japan and then Korea. The series includes images captured by the Terra and Aqua MODIS instruments between August 27 and August 31, 2002.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC