Hurricane Jeanne (11L) northeast of the Bahamas

Hurricane Jeanne spins in the Atlantic Ocean about 855 kilometers (530 miles) east of the Bahamas in this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image, captured by NASA’s Terra satellite on September 22, 2004. Though only a Category 2 hurricane, Jeanne has already been a deadly storm. Over 700 have died in Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico as a result of floods triggered by Jeanne’s torrential rains. Jeanne currently has winds of 160 kilometers per hour (100 mph) and is moving south at 7 kilometers per hour (5 mph). Though the storm’s course has not been easy to predict, the National Hurricane Center expected the storm to turn west and move towards the United States within a few days.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Satellite Image, Photo of Eleuthera Island, Bahamas

Eleuthera Island, Bahamas January 1997. The long, narrow Eleuthera Island can be seen in this mostly south-looking view. Like most of the Bahama Islands, Eleuthera is composed mainly of limestone and coral, and rises from a vast submarine plateau. The island, 80 miles (133 km) long, 2 miles (3 km) wide and covering an area of 164 sq. miles (425 sq. km), is generally low and flat, river- less, and has many mangrove swamps, brackish lakes, coral reefs and shoals, and many miles (km) of sandy beaches. Eleuthera, which means “Freedom” in Greek, was one of the earliest islands within the Bahamas to be colonized. Approximately 11000 people inhabit the island, which must get its fresh water from either rainfall or desalinazation. Hurricanes can occasionally cause severe damage to residences on the island. Eleuthera is a popular vacation resort area..
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Satellite Image, Photo of Crooked and Acklins Islands, Bahamas

Crooked Island and Acklins Island, Bahamas February 1984. Two of the many islands that make up the Bahamas are highlighted in this near-vertical photograph—Crooked Island to the northwest, separated by the Bight of Acklins from Acklins Island, the elongated, eastward island. The Bahamas comprise a dramatic combination of carbonate banks, islands, and deep water channels that have built up during the past 70 million years. Coral and algal reefs abound in the warm, shallow water. The strikingly different shades of blue provide a wealth of information about the water—the lighter shades, for example, show a variety of features within the very shallow waters, including constantly changing small banks, channels, ripples, shoals, grass, and algal beds. The dropoff from the shallow depths of generally less than 50 feet (15 meters) to depths exceeding 1000 feet (300 meters), represented by the darker blue, is abrupt and precipitous. Clarity of the water throughout the Bahamas primarily results from their distance from continental sediment sources. These two islands have not experienced the fairly rapid economic, tourist-related growth that many of the other Bahamas have experienced; however, several roads and two airport runways are visible..
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Satellite Image, Photo of Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas

Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas Winter/Spring 1997. The shallow Bahama shelf and the southern portion of the deep Tongue of the Ocean (darker water, upper right) can be seen in this northwest-looking view. The Tongue of the Ocean is one of two main branches that form the Great Bahama Canyon. The vertical rock walls of this submarine canyon rise 14060 feet (4285 meters) from the canyon floor to the surrounding seabed. The Grand Bahama Canyon has been traced for more than 140 miles (225 km) in length. The canyon has a width of 23 miles (37 km) at its deepest point and an average floor slope of about 300 feet per mile (60 meters per km). During the last Ice Age, nearly 12000 years ago, much of the Bahama Shelf was above sea level. Rainfall during that period formed erosional type gullies or small canyons as rainwater flowed off the shelf into the Tongue of the Ocean. As the climate warmed and the ice melted, sea levels rose to present levels covering the eroded gullies seen on this image..
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Satellite Image, Photo of the Bahamas

Grand Bahama Island, Freeport and Lucaya, Bahamas June 1998. The small cities of Freeport and Lucaya, on the southwest portion of Grand Bahama Island (slightly above the center of the view), can be seen in this southwest-looking view. Freeport and Lucaya are the Bahamas second largest metropolitan area. Nearly 50 years ago, neither city even existed. The Freeport and Lucaya region is a free trade zone area. Besides numerous tourist resorts and recreational areas, Freeport and Lucaya’s other activities include oil refining, cement production, distilling of liquor, and making of pharmaceutical products. As with the other islands of the Bahamas, Grand Bahama is composed largely of calcareous materials derived from marine organisms. A karst landscape covers many of the higher elevations on the island. Grand Bahama Island is 96 miles (154 km) long and 17 miles (27 km) at its widest point. The darker blue, deep waters of the Atlantic Ocean are visible in the upper portion of the view. The lighter blue, shallow waters covering the Bahama Shelf are discernible in the bottom portion of the view.
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Satellite Image, Photo of Andros Island and Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas

West Bank of Andros Island and Tongue of the Ocean. The dark blue area, aptly named "Tongue of the Ocean", is characterized by water depths as great as 3000 meters (almost 2 miles). The Atlantic Ocean just east of Eleuthera Island is nearly nearly 5000 meters deep. By comparison, the waters of the Bahama Platform are less than 15 meters deep. They are warm and become extremely salty due to evaporation and limited circulation from the open ocean. Crystals of aragonite, a calcium carbonate mineral derived from the shells of single celled marine organisms, and direct precipitation, form into oolites (small spherical grains of limestone) as the tidal currents swirl back and forth. Lithification of the carbonate sands produces an oolite limestone. Although the water is warm and clear, corals do not live in the shallows, probably because of the salt content. Though chemically very similar, the rocks resulting from this process have a quite different origin from those formed from coral reefs..
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Satellite Image, Photo of New Providence and Eleuthera Islands, Bahamas

New Providence and Eleuthera Islands, Bahamas Winter/Spring 1997. The Bahama Islands of New Providence (left center) and Eleuthera (right half) are visible in this north-northwest-looking view. New Providence Island, where the capital city of the Bahamas, Nassau is located, is 21 miles (34 km) long and 7 miles (11 km) wide and covers an area of 80 sq. miles (207 sq. km). Nassau is the commercial and social center of the Bahamas. The city has a large and beautiful harbor. Nassau has a warm, healthful climate, and a colorful atmosphere that makes the city a favorite winter resort. Eleuthera Island is 80 miles (133 km) long and 2 miles (3 km) wide, and covers an area of 164 sq. miles (425 sq. km). The island is generally flat and has no rivers. There are many mangrove swamps, brackish lakes, coral reefs and shoals, and miles (km) of fine sandy beaches. Eleuthera, which means "freedom" in Greek, was one of the first of the Bahama Islands to be colonized. The darker blue water of the Northeast Providence Channel (this is part of the Grand Bahama Submarine Canyon) is visible across the top portion of the image. The extreme southern portion of the Berry Islands, are discernible in the upper-left portion of the image. Covering the lower center portion of the image are the dark blue waters of Exuma Sound..
Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA/JPL/NIMA

Hurricane Jeanne (11L) off the Bahamas

So far in the 2004 Atlantic hurricane season, 12 tropical disturbances have formed of which six have become full-fledged hurricanes. The fifth hurricane of the Atlantic season, Hurricane Jeanne, is now taking aim at the Bahamas. The National Hurricane Center predicts that the storm will pass over the northern islands of the Bahamas early on Saturday before heading to Florida on Sunday. This image of the storm was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) on NASAs Terra satellite at 9:35 a.m. EST, on September 24, 2004. Hurricane Jeanne is a Category 2 storm with sustained winds near 160 kilometers per hour (100 mph) and stronger gusts.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Hurricane Frances (06L) over the Bahamas

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) aboard NASAs Aqua satellite captured this true-color image of Hurricane Frances on September 3, 2004, at 18:24 UTC (2:24 PM EDT). At the time this image was taken Frances was wreaking havoc in the Bahamas with sustained winds of 185 km/hr (115 mph) and a storm surge between 1.8 to 4.3 meters (6 and 14 feet) on the west side of Eleuthera Island. Frances was moving towards the west-northwest at 14 km/hr (9 mph) and was expected to reach the Florida coast in approximately 24 hours.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Bahamas

The emerald-green and turquoise-blue waters of the Bahamas glow brilliantly against the deep blue waters of the Atlantic Ocean in this true-color Terra MODIS image from December 13, 2002. The brightly colored waters illustrate the Great Bahama Bank, which is a platform of land that was submerged as the continental glaciers of the last ice age melted. The platform’s depth ranges from 25 meters to just barely covered by the tropical waters.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC