Fires in eastern India

Biomass burning is occurring across a broad section of eastern India on March 24, 2003. This image shows active fire detections marked in red. The image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Southern India

A few scattered fires burned in southern India on January 14, 2004, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) on NASAs Terra satellite captured this image. The fires have been marked with red dots. The two mountain ranges of southern India are defined by dark green vegetation that contrasts with the desert landscape. The Western Ghats run down the west coast of the Indian peninsula. Covered in montane and tropical rain forests, the mountains are home to a wide range of plants and animals, including Asian elephants and Indian tigers. Forming a “v” with the Western Ghats and running up the northeastern side of the Indian peninsula are the smaller Eastern Ghats. In between the two is the Deccan Plateau, a region of flat highlands.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in southern India

This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) image of southern and central India was captured on March 15, 2004 by NASAs Aqua satellite. Across the country, numerous fires are burning and have been marked in red in the image. Blue-gray smoke floats around the fires, particularly along the northeastern and southwestern coasts. In the bottom part of the scene, fires line the foothills of the Western (left) and Eastern (right) Ghats Mountains. In the top of the scene, the fires are predominantly located near rivers. The widespread nature of the fires and the time of year suggests that these fires are being set intentionally for agricultural purposes. Though these fires do not necessarily create an immediate hazard, such large-scale burning can have a strong impact on weather, climate, human health, and natural resources. For more information on how these fires affect the climate, the Earth Observatory presents an article on Biomass Burning.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Lakshadweep Islands, India

These tiny coral islands, the Lakshadweep (Laccadive) Islands, sit about 175 kilometers at the closest point off of India.s Malabar (lower western) Coast in the Arabian Sea. Lakshadweep means “hundred thousand islands” in the local Malayalam language, though the true number of these islands is about two dozen. The islands are scattered over 30,000 square kilometers of the Arabian Sea, but have a total landmass of only 32 square kilometers. Only ten of the islands are inhabited. This true-color Terra MODIS image was acquired December 22, 2002.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Southern India

Numerous scattered fires (red dots) were detected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite across southern India on January 31, 2003. Fire are especially concentrated in the Nallamala Hills region of the Eastern Ghats along India’s Indian Ocean coast (right). Fires also drape down the Western Ghat Mountains on India’s Arabian Sea coast (left).
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in eastern India

In March and April 2003, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS) on the Aqua and Terra satellites detected scores of smoky fires (red dots) burning in eastern India south of the Ganges River (upper right). Smoke is wafting out over the Bay of Bengal (right).
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in eastern India

On April 11, 2003, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite captured this image of fires (red dots) burning in eastern India, southwest of the Ganges River, which stretches out diagonally across the image. Fire activity has risen and fallen over the past month as agricultural activities get underway. Fires are also visible beneath the clouds along the eastern coast.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Tropical Cyclone 03B over India

Tropical Cyclone 03B raked across southeast Indias Andhra Pradesh state early on December 16, 2003. The storm brought 75 mile per hour winds, heavy rains, and cool temperatures, all of which forced nearly 20,000 people to flee their homes. As of December 17, 2003, officials had reported nine cyclone-related deaths, but media reports gave much higher figures. The storm destroyed homes, uprooted trees, and devastated crops. It was the first cyclone to hit the state in the last 18 years. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image was acquired on December 15, 2003, by the Terra satellite.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC