Typhoon Krovanh (12W) approaching the Philippines

Typhoon Krovanh approaches the Philippines in this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image captured by the Terra satellite on August 21, 2003, at 02:25 UTC (3:50 p.m. local time). At that time, the storm packed winds of an estimated 65 knots (75 mph) with gusts up to 80 knots (90 mph).
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Super Typhoon Nida (04W) over the Philippines

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) onboard NASAs Aqua satellite captured this true-color image of Super Typhoon Nida churning through the Philippine Islands on May 18, 2004. Packing winds of 100 miles per hour and gusts of up to 122 mph, the typhoon caused floods and landslides in the Bicol region of the main island of Luzon. Nida has been responsible for at least six deaths in the Philippines and has displaced thousands as it skirted the eastern part of the country before moving towards southern Japan.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Typhoon Imbudo (09W) over the Philippines

Typhoon Imbudo is shown draped over the Philippines in this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from the Aqua satellite on July 22, 2003. The storm was a Super Typhoon just yesterday (July 21) but it weakened a bit over land. The storm is moving west-northwest, and is headed for the southern China coast.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Typhoon Conson (07W) off the Philippines

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image of Typhoon Conson on June 8, 2004, at 5:05 UTC. At the time this image was taken, Conson had maximum sustained winds of 75 miles per hour with higher gusts to 88 mph. Conson was moving towards the north-northeast at 10 mph and is expected to bring heavy rains and winds to southeastern Taiwan.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Typhoon Mindulle (10W) over the Philippines

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured this true-color image of Typhoon Mindulle on June 29, 2004, at 2:20 UTC as the storm was located approximately 450 miles south-southeast of Tapei, Taiwan. At the time this image was taken, Mindulle had sustained winds of 144 miles per hour with higher gusts to 173 miles per hour. Mindulle was expected to drift towards the west and make landfall over the northern Philippines.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Typhoon Nida (04W) over the Philippines

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) onboard NASAs Aqua satellite captured this true-color image of Typhoon Nida churning in the waters 414 miles east-southeast of Manila. At the time this image was taken, Nida was packing sustained winds of 150 miles per hour with gusts to 185 mph and was moving towards the northwest at 12 mph.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Typhoon Nida (04W) over the Philippines

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) onboard NASAs Terra satellite captured this true-color image of Typhoon Nida swirling in the waters 230 miles east of Manila. At the time this image was taken, Nida was packing sustained winds of 150 miles per hour with gusts to 185 mph. More than 16,000 people have been displaced or stranded in the eastern and central Philippines as hurricane-force winds forced ports to close.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Floods in the Philippines (false color)

Four tropical storms in two weeks have saturated Luzon Island, the main island in the Philippines, causing devastating flooding. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) on NASAs Terra satellite captured this image of the island after the clouds from the most recent storm, Typhoon Nanmadol , cleared on December 4, 2004. Rivers throughout the island are swollen far beyond their normal size, as shown in the comparison image acquired on October 19. The most dramatic flooding is along the Cagayan River in the north and the Pampanga River in the south, but other rivers are also swollen. Further evidence of flooding is in the color of the water. In this false color treatment, water is typically dark blue or black. In the flood image, the water is light blue—a sign that it is tinted with sediment. A light blue plume in Manila Bay is also sediment. As flood waters gush over the land, they carry mud into the rivers and the surrounding ocean. The sediment is more obvious in the true color version of the image, where Manila Bay appears to be filled with mud. Over 1,000 people are dead or missing as a result of flooding and landslides in the past week, according to media reports. The most severely impacted communities are in the Sierra Madre, where landslides buried whole communities.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Floods in the Philippines

Four tropical storms in two weeks have saturated Luzon Island, the main island in the Philippines, causing devastating flooding. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) on NASAs Terra satellite captured this image of the island after the clouds from the most recent storm, Typhoon Nanmadol , cleared on December 4, 2004. Rivers throughout the island are swollen far beyond their normal size, as shown in the comparison image acquired on October 19. The most dramatic flooding is along the Cagayan River in the north and the Pampanga River in the south, but other rivers are also swollen. Further evidence of flooding is in the color of the water. In this false color treatment, water is typically dark blue or black. In the flood image, the water is light blue—a sign that it is tinted with sediment. A light blue plume in Manila Bay is also sediment. As flood waters gush over the land, they carry mud into the rivers and the surrounding ocean. The sediment is more obvious in the true color version of the image, where Manila Bay appears to be filled with mud. Over 1,000 people are dead or missing as a result of flooding and landslides in the past week, according to media reports. The most severely impacted communities are in the Sierra Madre, where landslides buried whole communities.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Tropical Cyclone Kujira (02W) east of the Philippines

This true-color image from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 19, 2003, shows Tropical Cyclone Kujira in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of the Philippines.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC