Typhoon Krovanh (12W) over China

The MODIS instrument onboard NASA’s Terra spacecraft captured this true-color image of Typhoon Krovanh as it was exiting the tropical island province of Hainan on August 25, 2003. Krovanh slammed into the island with howling winds and heavy rains and cut electricity in parts of its capital, Haikou.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Dust storm in Tengger Desert, northcentral China

The peaks of the Helan Shan (shan=mountains) rise up to form a natural border to the eastern edge of the Tengger Shamo (shamo=desert) in northern China, a few hundred miles south of the border with Mongolia. In this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 12, 2003, a dust storm is creating a pale haze over the vegetation along the banks of the areas rivers and streams.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Bo Hai and northeastern China

The rivers of northeast China spill sediment into the Bo Hai, a bay off the Yellow Sea, in this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image taken by the Terra satellite on October 18, 2003. The largest offender is the Yellow River, bottom, which carries dust from the Gobi Desert of Inner Mongolia down through the North China Plain before pouring into the Bo Hai. The cement-colored patch on the western tip of the bay is Tianjin (Tientsin).
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Typhoon Krovanh (12W) approaching China

The MODIS instrument onboard the Terra spacecraft captured this birds-eye view of Typhoon Krovanh on August 24, 2003, at 03:00 UTC as it was churning in the South China Sea. The Hainan Provincial Meteorological Observatory said that the typhoon was centered approximately 80 km west of the Philippines and was expected to affect south Chinas Hainan and Guangdong provinces by late Sunday.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Pollution in eastern China

A thick pall of pollution covers eastern China in this true-color Terra MODIS image acquired November 21st, 2002. The pollution lies very close to the ground and tends to follow the terrain by collecting in valleys and low-lying areas while being hemmed in by mountains. The pollution is so thick in places that it completely obscures the ground and water beneath it. In contrast to the pollution are the bright white clouds that cover the lower right portion of the image.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in southern China

More than a dozen fires are burning in the forested hills surrounding the cities clustered around Hu Men Bay in southern China on January 10, 2003. This true-color image from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite shows the active fires marked in red. Some of the fires have smoke plumes drifting southward. The city of Canton is roughly centered in the image, with Hong Kong to the east, on the other side of the bay.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Eastern China

Higher elevations and latitudes are still colored in winter´s brown, but most of eastern China shown in this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from the Terra satellite on April 16, 2003, is wearing spring green. At top (right of center), the Shandong Province has yet to green up, while to its southwest, the Henan Province is looking more spring-like. The mountains of the Shaanxi Province are green at the lower elevations and brown higher up the slopes. The prominent river running roughly west to east through the bottom part of the image is the Yangtze, which flows past the city of Shanghai and spills its light-colored sediments out into the Huang Hai (Yellow Sea, north of the river mouth) and the Dong Hai (East China Sea, south of the river mouth). South of the River the terrain becomes more mountainous and rugged, and more heavily forested, in contrast to the low basin to the north. The low-lying area is dotted with cities and towns, which appear as brown dots that look like they have been airbrushed over the green background. A few scattered fires were detected by MODIS and are marked with red dots.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires and haze in southeastern China

A dark gray pall of haze filled the skies over much of southeastern China on November 30, 2003, while more than a dozen fires (red pixels) dotted the landscape around Hong Kong. (The black polygon toward the bottom center of this scene shows Hong Kong’s location.) The coastal waters along Southeast Asia appear turquoise and tan, probably due to sediment-laden river discharge as well as bottom sediments being churned by the series of cyclones that have passed through the Western Pacific in recent weeks. This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image was captured by the Aqua satellite.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Southern China

Scattered fire, red dots, burned across Southern China on February 14, 2004. Because of the widespread nature of the fires, they were probably started for agricultural purposes. A thin pall of grey haze hangs over the land and the South China Sea. Haze is very common in China during the winter as people burn coal for heat. In contrast to the green and tan inland, the coast is densely populated, packed with grey cities. The largest city, in the lower right portion of the image, is Guangzhou (Canton). Hong Kong is southeast of Guangzhou. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer ( MODIS ) on NASAs Terra satellite captured this image.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Eastern China

Flying aboard NASA’s Terra satellite, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) captured this clear view of the mouth of the Yangtze River in eastern China on May 6, 2004. Sprawling gray patches show this to be a densely populated region of China. The city of Shanghai is the large concrete-colored area nearest the point where the Yangtze spills into the East China Sea. To its left is Lake Tai. Numerous other gray regions mark nearby cities. Sediment carried from the river colors the Sea tan near the shore. As the sediment diffuses, the water becomes a milky green, which eventually fades into the deep blue of clearer water.
Source: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC