Antarctica physical map

Antarctica physical map. Landsat image mosaic of Antartica (LIMA) project.
Source: owje.com

Antarctica topography and bathymetry 2008

Subglacial topography and bathymetry of Antarctica. As indicated at the left of the map, the different shades of blue and purple indicates the parts of the ocean bottom and the bedrock under the ice, that are below sea level. The other colors indicate the Antarctic bedrock that extends over the sea level. Each color represents a range of 2,500 feet. The map is not corrected for rising sea levels and isostatic rebound, that would occur if the Antarctic ice sheet completely melted to expose the bedrock surface. March 13, 2008
Source: BEDMAP Consortium

Shaded Relief Map of Antarctica 2008

Antarctica without its ice sheet. This map does not consider that sea level would rise because of the melted ice, nor that the landmass would rise by several hundred meters over a few tens of thousands of years after the weight of the ice was no longer depressing the landmass. August 27, 2008
Source: Paul V. heinrich

Antarctica physical map

Antarctica, on average, is the coldest, driest, and windiest continent, and has the highest average elevation of all the continents. Antarctica is considered a desert, with annual precipitation of only 200 mm (8 inches) along the coast and far less inland. There are no permanent human residents but anywhere from 1,000 to 5,000 people reside throughout the year at the research stations scattered across the continent. Only cold-adapted plants and animals survive there, including penguins, seals, many types of algae, and tundra vegetation.
Source: owje.com

Antarctica without ice sheet 2006

Antarctica without ice sheet 2006. Rock surface of Antarctica and sea ground without its ice-shield, from 60 to 90 degrees South. This map does not consider that sea level would rise because of the melted ice, nor that the landmass would rise by several hundred meters over a few tens of thousands of years after the weight of the ice was no longer depressing the landmass.
Source: BEDMAP Consortium