Antarctica map 1906

Inset maps of Cape town, Cape of good hope, Magalhaes strait, Hobart, Port Elizabeth.
Source: Justhus Perthes

Antarctic ice sheet (interglacial period)

Principle drawing of the size and structure of the Antarctic ice sheet during an interglacial, comparable to the recent stage.

* thick lines: ice divide
* thin lines: ice flow lines
* turquoise areas: ice shelf
* red areas: not ice covered (2.8 % of total area)
* blue shaded areas increment by 1000 m in thickness
Source: Hannes Grobe, Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany

Antarctic ice sheet (glacial period)

Maximum extent of the Antarctic ice sheet during glacial cycles, e.g. at 21,000 years before present. Extent and volume changes are closely linked with grounding line changes of the West Antarctic ice sheet due to sea level lowering. At the glacial maximum, the grounding line extended close to the continental shelf break almost everywhere. Ice over central East Antarctica was generally thinner than today and varied mainly in accordance with accumulation fluctuations. Color shadings are increments of 500 m ice thickness.
Source: Hannes Grobe, Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany

Terra Australis Incognita 1657

Map showing pencilled land labelled Terra Australis Incognita, where we now situate Antarctica.
Source: Johannes Janssonius