The Ukraine Coast

The Dnieper River flows south through the Ukraine into the northern end of the Black Sea, shown here in this true-color Aqua MODIS image from September 15, 2004. On either side of the river, red dots mark the locations of fires scattered throughout the countrys rich farmlands. The fires, some of which show smoke plumes drifting off in the atmosphere, are likely agricultural in nature, given the season, lack of tree-cover, and light smoke. Both the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov show swirls of color in their waters. These colors are likely to be blooms of aquatic plants like phytoplankton or algae, though some might be sediment from the Dnieper and other rivers. In the case of the Azov, the cloudiness of the water is more likely to be from sediment; the sea is a maximum of 13 meters deep, and getting shallower as the Don and Kuban rivers empty sediment as well as fresh water into it. The Kerch Strait connects the Sea of Azov to the Black Sea in the lower right of the image.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Sea of Azov, Crimea and Black Sea, Ukraine

Like many bodies of water throughout the world, including the North American Great Lakes, the Sea of Azov (right of center) has been facing problems related to eutrophication over the past decades. Eutrophication is the excessive influx of nutrients into waterways and wetlands most often caused by run-off polluted with fertilizers and other chemicals that spur the rapid growth of algae and plants, which die off and decompose, robbing oxygen from the water in the process. Often these blooms of plant life kill fish and other aquatic animals by suffocation or the release of toxins into the water. The purplish-green cast of the waters of the Sea of Azov contrasts with the clearer waters of the Black Sea (below and left) in this true-color image collected on April 21, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The coloration probably results from a combination of ecological and hydrological factors affecting the sea, including sedimentation and mineral and organic pollutants. Throughout the Ukraine countryside (north), MODIS has detected several fires; these are indicated by red dots.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in Ukraine

Numerous fires were detected burning in the Ukraine on August 9, 2002. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows the fires marked with red dots. The false-color image highlights burned areas, which stand out in reddish brown amid bright green. The large river at image left is the Dnipro River, which flows into the Black Sea.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Fires in Ukraine

Numerous fires were detected burning in the Ukraine on August 9, 2002. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows the fires marked with red dots. The false-color image highlights burned areas, which stand out in reddish brown amid bright green. The large river at image left is the Dnipro River, which flows into the Black Sea.
Source: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

Space Radar Image of Dnieper River, Ukraine

This spaceborne radar image shows the intensive agricultural development in central Ukraine, along the Dnieper River. The area shown lies about 320 kilometers (198 miles) southeast of Kiev and about 360 kilometers (223 miles) northeast of Odessa. Central Ukraine is a rich agricultural region, producing primarily wheat and other grains. In this radar image taken in the early spring, most of the fields do not have active crops, so their relatively smooth texture results in dark shades of brown and purple. Boundaries between the fields consist of hedges or trees which appear as bright outlines. The bright yellowish areas along the river are riparian (riverbank) forest. The small tributary that flows into the Dnieper from the right side of the image is the Volchya River. Radar images can be used to map crop types, to monitor the health of crops, and to predict yields. This image was acquired by Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 15, 1994. The image is 45 kilometers by 35 kilometers (28 miles by 22 miles) and is centered at 49.0 degrees North latitude, 34.1 degrees East longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L- band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C- band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and United States space agencies, is part of NASAs Mission to Planet Earth.
Source: NASA JPL